+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Regulator

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    177

    Default Regulator

    Our relief valve keeps blowing water out of our oil fired boiler baseboard circulation system. The valve has been replaced. The furnace man says the fresh water regulator that back feeds the system has gone bad. Does this sound right? Can a normal DIY guy replace the regulator? Where would one get a new regulator at?

    Thanks for any help!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Regulator

    Did he check the expansion tank to be sure the tank still has an air charge? Also, if the boiler has a tankless coil it's possible that the coil is leaking into the boiler. How did he check which part is no good?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: Regulator

    He did mention that the expansion tank may be bad...but I replaced that with a bladder version about 5 years ago. I don't think that is the problem. I don't know about the coils leaking. How could he check that? I think this boiler is about 30 YO. How long do these things last?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Regulator

    I've seen bladder tanks fail in less than a year and I've seen some that are 30 years old. Does the boiler pressure increase only when the burner is running or does it increase even with the burner off? If the pressure only goes up when the burner is running the tank is either no good or it lost the charge. It it goes up even with the burner off, then the auto feed or coil is constantly feeding in water. Turn off the system, then shut off the valve to the feed and the cold water valve feeding the tankless coil. You can do them one at a time to tell which it is.

    Coils don't leak all that often, usually they'll last for the life of the boiler.

    To check the tank, shut off the burner, shut off the auto feed, and let enough water out of the boiler to drop the pressure to zero. Use a tire gauge at the Schrader valve, pressure should be about 12psi. If you remove the cap from the valve while the system is pressurized and water comes out you know without a doubt the tank is no good.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: Regulator

    the relief valve only blows out water when the boiler is running. The valve vents sporadically.

    I do not believe there is a Shraeder valve on the expansion tank...but I will check.

    When the boiler is not running the circulation pump is also not running. So wouldn't the pressure in the system drop when the boiler is off....regardless of what the surge tank is doing?

    BTW...how long does a boiler system usually survive? The system was installed in 1972. Is it time for me to consider upgrading?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Regulator

    Every bladder type expansion tank has a Schrader valve to pressurize the tank initially and to check the charge when or if needed. If the relief valve only spits water when the burner is running you most likely have a problem with the expansion tank, either no/insufficient charge or the bladder is shot.
    Last edited by jim hankinson; 06-17-2010 at 04:21 PM. Reason: spelling error

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    93

    Default Re: Regulator

    Bad expansion tank. There should be a little cap on the bottom of the tank that covers a schrader valve. Push it, get water, the tank is blown and is time for a new tank. A general way to tell is if you hit the tank and it sounds like a rock.

    There is no set time frame when a "system" will fail. A boiler in your case is once piece of an entire system and being as old as it is and dependent on your financial situtation it probably is time to start looking at replacing the boiler.

    Now that is a whole other subject. If you decide to look at replacing the boiler your first step would be to have a heat loss done of your home to size the boiler correctly to the load that is needed to satisfy the heat loss. More than 50 percent of heating systems according to the dept of energy are OVERSIZED. Based on my 20 plus yrs in this industry I think that number is conservative.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Regulator

    I'll agree with that. Unfortunately it seems that the closest most jobs come to having a heat loss done is calculating the connected load because it's easy. However, with all the heatloss software available for almost no cost it's really criminal not to do a real heat loss.

    I used to use the IBR forms before PC's were all that common and even that didn't take that long. Whichever method is used, computer or paper, it can open a door for companies that offer weatherization programs. You can identify areas of heat loss that will save money over time, example, additional insulation, new windows, doors, etc.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1

    Unhappy Re: Regulator

    Hello

    This is Gareth Jones

    Every bladder type expansion tank has a Schrader valve to pressurize the tank initially and to check the charge when or if needed. If the relief valve only spits water when the burner is running you most likely have a problem with the expansion tank, either no/insufficient charge or the bladder is shot.

    Gareth
    CNM ******

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: Regulator

    Thanks for all the comments. I will check into the expansion tank. If the boiler is not running will all the same checks still work? As it has been so hot lately, I have not paid attention to the problem.

    How does one do a check for the heat load? What should I be asking contractors?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •