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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2

    Default correcting low water pressure

    Over the years, as the area has grown, our water pressure has dropped off considerably. The water dept checked the pressure at the main several years ago and it was 15 psi. at the meter. They said that was all they were required to provide. My house is about 200 feet from the meter and up about 30 foot grade. You can literally stop the water coming out of the water house with your thumb. My neighbor, who is considerably higher and further away from the main than I, sunk a 250-gallon supply tank and pumps from it like a well to solve his problem. My question, can I use some sort of pump to boost my pressure directly from the main or do I have to do the same as my neighbor and sink a tank? His pressure was much lower than mine. If a pump can be used, what type is best? Many thanks Ron

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Coventry, RI
    Posts
    340

    Default Re: correcting low water pressure

    You can boost your city water pressure with a pump and tank that you can put in the house rather than pumping from a supply tank like your neighbor. There are a few different types some with tanks like in a well system and some with just a pump motor. The key is that they are plumbed so that they only come on when extra water pressure is needed. If you are just washing your hands at the bathroom sink you probably don't need the pump. When you are taking a shower it will likely come on. Your best bet is to either get a plumber in to figure out what would be best in your situation or at least go to a plumbing supply house and see what they recommend. If you are handy with plumbing and electrical you may be able to install it yourself and save some money. Hope this helps you out.

    Mike

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    West Jordan, Utah
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: correcting low water pressure

    15 PSI is extremely low pressure at the meter, I'm not sure about where you live, our state regulations require us to maintain a minimum of 40 PSI during peak day demand. We must maintain 20 PSI during peak day demand under conditions of fire flow. Our regulations also do not allow individual home booster pumps in our system, you may want to check your state's regulations.
    The 30 foot rise from the meter to your house would reduce the available pressure at your house by 13 PSI and with 200 feet of friction losses in your service line, I would not expect to see any water flow in your house under these conditions.
    Slow The Flow

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,789

    Default Re: correcting low water pressure

    Here's a link to pressure booster pumps http://www.amtrol.com/pressuriser.htmJack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: correcting low water pressure

    Thanks for the great advise. I don't know if the pressure is 15 psi at the meter, as I did not test it myself. I am only going on what the neighbor told me. My neighbor did however unsuccessfully sue the public service district, claiming that the pressure was below the minimum allowable. The PSD won the case based on a 30 year document signed by my neighbor when the public water was brought into our area. The document released the PSD of the responsibility of maintaining adequate pressure at the meter. They took the PSD all the way to the state capitol and lost. There is no beating the Man lol. My house set above the small supply tank which is about 2500 feet away, and I can stop the water from coming out of my garden hose with just my thumb pressed over it. I am going to rig something up and see exactly what the pressure is in the spring. That web sit looks like what I need, thanks.

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