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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Florissant, Missouri
    Posts
    29

    Default painting an exterior metal door

    I need to paint my Stanley exterior front door which is metal. I tried to google "Stanley" and could only come up with sellers of Stanley products but nothing for Stanley doors or a Stanley company. BUT that is not my question. I have this metal door which was painted with latex paint when we moved here. It started to chip and peel and while it was fun to peel big sheets of paint off of the door it left me with a naked door. The door is very smooth. I am guessing that it should be painted with an oil based paint. If this is wrong let me know. I do not know how to prep this door for paint. Could someone tell me how? Also what is the best way to do this whole thing so that I don't have to have the door off its hinges (or open) while it dries for too long (I would prefer not to have my front door open all night for too long). I am only painting the outside of the door at this time. The door is currently white and I will be painting it black. Thanks in advance for your help.
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing - Edmund Burke

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The deep South
    Posts
    459

    Default Re: painting an exterior metal door

    Since no real painters have responded , go to Lowe's or that other place , and look at the product literature on a similar door . It should tell you how to prep and paint it .

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,480

    Default Re: painting an exterior metal door

    The paint likely failed due to poor or lack of initial prep. I would recommend making sure all of this coating is removed before starting to paint.

    Proper prep would be to wash the door down with Tri Sodium Phosphate (TSP ), which will clean any dirt, grease and grime from the surface, as well as slightly etch the surface for better adhesion of your new finish coats. Rinse well after washing and allow to fully dry. Apply a good primer, such as Zinnser Bullseye 123 (blue label ). Primer sticks to the substrate better and creates a better binding layer for the paint to adhere to. I would also tint the primer towards your finish coat color to help reduce the number of coats and the coverage of the top coat.

    I would stick with either a latex or an alkyd paint. Latex is easier to work with, alkyd is a harder, more durable paint (replacement to oil based paint ). You can paint the door while on the hinge, but you will need to remove the weather strip from around the door first. This will allow the door to be closed while wet, yet not be damaged by anything touching it. It will be best to apply the paint in cooler temperatures and not in direct sunlight. You can use a roller to apply the paint, then a brush to lay it off (smooth out the roller marks ). Working quickly in wet paint will allow you to get the finish on the door with minimal streaking and brush marks. Give a light sanding between coats will help to reduce brush marks as well. Once the door has cured/dried for several days, you can reinstall the weatherstrip around the door.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,583

    Default Re: painting an exterior metal door

    Samsmom,

    Apparently your door was painted with an acrylic paint right over the factory "primer". Metal doors often come with a very slick white primer which is unsuitable for direct application of acrylic paint.

    Assuming that most of the old paint has peeled off, you should re-prime the door if you are going to use acrylic(latex) paint again. "Gripper" primer by Glidden will give very good adhesion to the door. You can then follow up with a finish coat or two of satin or semi-gloss acrylic paint. Acrylic paints are generally more color fast then oil paints and are much faster drying.

    If you use oil paint, you can give the door a scuff sanding with fine sandpaper and then simply finish coat with the oil paint. If you do this early in the morning, it should be dry by the afternoon.

    If the weather is cool or rainy, I would often buy a sheet of styrofoam sheathing at the home center and cut it to fit the opening with a razor knife. Sheathing only costs several dollars for a 4x8 sheet.

    If you pull the surface-seating weatherstripping first, you can close the door even before it is fully dry. Better to let it dry first ,however.

    If you are using acrylic paint, you must work rapidly , as the paint wants to quickly skin over. With either oil or acrylic paint, the normal procedure is to paint all the panels first and then the stiles and rails of the door. Make sure you don't let acrylic paint dry on the face of the door around the panels. I wipe these edges immediately upon finishing the panel. I like to use a small foam roller to speed up the even application of paint to the surface, followed by a light brushing to knock done the roller texture.


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Arlington, Texas
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: painting an exterior metal door

    In the past I have gone to Sherwin Williams and bought DTM (Direct to metal) paint. I have painted aluminum and wrought iron with it and not had any problems. It is designed for metal application. I am no pro, just what I have done. But definitely clean before you apply....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: painting an exterior metal door

    Latex paint is good. But which latex paint? All exterior latex paints are meant to be placed in full sun, and they will all fade over time with sun exposure.

    The key is buying a high-quality acrylic latex house and trim paint. Get a 100% acrylic paint. It's my understanding that the acrylic polymer is one of the most sunlight-resistant polymers available, so the more the merrier.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: painting an exterior metal door

    Metal doors move too much during temperature changes to allow house paint to adhere long term. Rustoleum has metal spray paints that give a nice appearance and would cover all different materials for this door. Rustoleum paint that have a few years on them and no complaints of fade. Rustoleum is made to be exposed to outside elements.

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