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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    College Station, TX
    Posts
    1

    Default Installing a humidity control fan in the bathroom

    I live in Texas. At the time the house was built, local code didn't require an exhaust fan if the bathroom had a window that opens. Fine. But I live in sub-tropical Texas, and 10 months out of the year the humidity is pretty significant. The upshot is, I've now got an active mold problem.

    I'm looking at a significant bathroom renovation, including replacing all the cabinets, increasing the size of the room, probably adding a shower and leaving the tub/shower as a tub only, and, of course, adding an exhaust fan.

    What's the conventional wisdom on the newer, and more expensive fans with humidistats, that can run 'til the exhaust air is "dry enough? Or, should I just go with an exhaust fan?

    Obviously, I'll be removing all the overhead insulation in the attic and replacing the mold-infested drywall. I'll be looking at the studs when they're exposed, and will bleach-treat 'em or replace if necessary.New cabinets, new walls, new vanity, resurface the tub.

    What else should I consider?

    gc

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Installing a humidity control fan in the bathroom

    Yes, this is a very annoying problem, I cannot get rid of it either..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Installing a humidity control fan in the bathroom

    yes,It 's very annoying. Installing the exhaust of the fan in the soffit is problematic. On most houses, the soffit is the intake of the attic ventilation. Exhausting humid air at that place will create humidity problem in the attic.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Installing a humidity control fan in the bathroom

    From a non-spammer I'll throw in 2 cents worth.

    You could go for the expensive humistat controlled exhaust systems , however, you could simply install a common exhaust fan that will less expensive.
    The key is having the proper sized fan or fans for the square footge of your bathroom. In some respects , the more CFM the better.
    Another consideration is the fan should be switched independentley the bathroom light. You can also have the fan controlled by a timer so it runs at least 20 minutes after showers are taken.

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