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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010

    Default wall insulation predicament

    OK... I'm buying this old farmhouse. Behind the various wall coverings, all I see is boards. (No lath and plaster ANYwhere.) It's been suggested that after removing the wall coverings, I should just remove all the boards, put up fiberglass batts, and re-cover with drywall -- apparently just doing away with the boards.

    This sounds like a lot of work to me. Plus, I'm not at all certain I want to lose those boards. Wouldn't they be another level of insulation?

    It's occured to me to just remove a few boards -- a couple low on the wall, a couple up higher -- put in the fiberglass (by folding it and pushing it under remaining boards?), then re-attach the boards and cover with drywall. Wouldn't that work just as well?

    Or am I just being too sentimental about those nice old boards?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Elyria, Oh.

    Default Re: wall insulation predicament

    Rent a machine that blows insulation into the stud pockets, using a hole saw cut a hole inside or outside the house and blow cellulose insulation into the stud pockets. Home Depot has a deal when you buy so many bales of insulation you get the machine free. You need two people to handle this project, one to feed the machine and one to handle the hose that blows the insulation in the stud pockets. This is a easy project to DIY. Wear a mask. Trying to remove boards and stuff fiberglass insulation is way to much work and lots of mess.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Northern Virginia

    Default Re: wall insulation predicament

    It could be that the interior sheathing is performing a valuable effort to the structure. I have seen this on old houses where the weatherboards are applied directly to the studs, the sheathing is on the inside. Removal would weaken the racking strength. Yes, you can remove a few boards to wire, plumb and insulate, then put them back, add vapor barrier, and drywall.
    My parent's 1888 home in Arkansas was built like that.
    My current residence (900 miles from AR) has interior sheathing on the 1850 section.

    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

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