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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    taking the window out wouldn't be a good option in this case, It looks to me like the window is about 32 to 36 inches tall which wouldn't be enough room. you would have to have around 4 and 1/2 feet to get the sheetrock in otherwise it would bust the edges of the rock up when booming in. as well as the window is usually installed first then the siding making removing the window a real pain.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    I should have been more specific and said can you get the window "sashes" out rather than "window". It does look kinda small for a 4' wide sheet, though. Didn't know what the diagonal would measure if the sashes could be removed.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    I never let my guys pull in through a window unless the window is way oversized of the rock not just because of messing up the rock but on the commercial jobs also messing up the window frame. (never cheap for the window man to go back and replace) and a window opening that is tight seems to always to make more work then bringing it up the stairs, which in this case you just break out the grill and the cooler full of beer and call over some friends to help. have them set the rock inside the garage (nice and dry) then on a saturday have a few friends over, and ohhhh by the way can you guys give me a hand before we fire up the grill.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    246

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    What about aluminum or vinyl soffit? Would that work for you?

    I might do that in my workshop area.
    "Life does not go by the book, we learn as we go along".

    You only need two tools in life - WD-40 and Duct Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use WD-40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the Duct Tape.


  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    we built a similar looking barn from purchased plans and spec'd trusses our plans were specific that a finished floor for storage loft but that the trusses could not be loaded with finishing material as a ceiling. i'd be concerned that you might have similar situation especially since your ceiling height is less than 8 feet kind of indicates the storage loft was not designe to be finished.

    30x36' ceiling area on 24" OC trusses metal building might be a lot of temperature flexing and uplift drywall ceiling that big area might need expansion joints breaking things up anyway if the truss bottoms or chords aren't moving too much anyway to cause it all to crack. if your trusses can handle a ceiling finish loading you might be better off with insulated panels mabe even a coffered panel system on tracks. bonus is that you also have more insulation. what are you doing for your second fire escape? is there a ladder or platform out the back?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    980

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    you don't have to worry about expansion joints or load weight due to your drywall. you are fine on all that. the garage unit you bought is designed with the loft to be finished in the way you are going about doing it. drywall is hung in metal buildings everyday with out adverse consequences. here is a quote from the national gypsum company on spec. requirements regarding expansion joints in ceilings.

    Control joints are required in ceilings to limit areas to 2,500 square feet. Additionally, control joints should be installed in ceilings to limit dimensions in either direction to 50 feet. Control joints should be installed where ceiling framing or furring changes direction.

    the previous poster while well intentioned tends to be extremely overly cautious beyond what specs. or any other requirements demand.



  7. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    Yes, the trusses were indeed designed to carry the load of power tools and all, and be finished. (not that my cheapie tools are that heavy!) The low height is because the designer called and asked if I HAD to have the 8'.... to keep the design angles and to add more strength he said he'd feel better beefing up the lower part, but it meant I'd lose some height to gain strength. They said the original design should be fine, but he'd just feel better.............. so they made the lower boards (whatever those are called) "taller".

    The builders were fantastic and I'll request them for any future projects. Perfectionists. I could not find a single "do-over".

    I do believe I'll go sheetrock on the walls, especially since I'll be building storage into some of the areas between trusses, and the steel ceiling will be SO much easier - no overhead finishing work to do, and lighter. It's just me doing this......

    I do appreciate all the advice and thoughts and suggestions!

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    chords or truss chords are those lower boards already hung your steel ceiling on. since you have this great relationship with the designer and builder, ask them their opinion of your best options and materials. i'd be concerned about truss uplift issues with direct installation of ceiling finish above and drywall walls above the chords with the design and materials of your barn and access issues to the systems like if you want to make a change to the wiring or add a fan or exaust system later thats why i suggested a minimally suspended insulated panel track system access and insulation and light weight and overlapping allowing for some flex without cracking or dust gaps also can have flush light diffusers and the light fixtures installed above between the chords i saw the lights you had run perpindicular on your web page if you ran them parallel and raised up with flush diffusers to the ceiling you might gain head room. if you do sheet rock the walls i'd go with paperless drywall and use fiberglass mesh to tape the walls. thats a high second level and i'd be concerned about moisture mold rot issues in the summer it would be expensive to air condition imagine it would get very humid and hot up there by the end of the summer.

    i noticed on your photo pages you said the ceiling clearance was to be seven not seven and a half feet so i'm guessing you were supposed to build an indepenant ceiling grid below the truss chords if you were going to drywall and have a hot/cold attic space? i'm very curious how you are going to keep the area ventillated with two small windows for such a large and long space because you described the loft on the photo pages as a woodworking shop.
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 11-15-2008 at 11:39 AM.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,836

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    Yep, they're called the bottom chords.


    I don't think truss lift is going to be a problem because the wall structure is plated rather than nailed An access door to the truss area can be installed in a steel ceiling just like any other ceiling.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Central Iowa
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: "sheetrock" for my barn/shop

    Sort of deviating from the topic, but what is "truss lift"?
    Also, I love the suggestion of leaving a "way" into the upper area. In fact, I should leave an access "door" through the west wall as that is where the wires come up from the lower level should I ever need access. I can put some plywood across the trusses and make a doorway back into that west/nw area, and leave an access opening in a couple spots with insulated panels I can lift out of place.
    I should have assumed that anything associated with TOH would be first-rate.
    I'll take some more photos of my progress.
    I'm running a couple thin wires across the backsides of the uprights to help support the insulation. I'm putting backed 23" wide by 6" thick insulation stapled to the "studs" but wonder about the insulation sagging off the backing, so figured a couple thin wires stapled along the backside would help support it. One will be about a foot or so down, the other about mid-way down. On normal walls, there's the outside wall to help support and hold the insulation. Nothing here, just open space.
    6" thick may be overkill, but I can't find anything thinner in the width for 24" spacing.

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