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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3

    Default Painting an interior door

    Trying to re-paint an interior door because the dog scratched it up! I've sanded it down and spackled the grooves from the dog, and during my final sanding the old paint really started to chip off.
    My question is should I go ahead and strip all the old paint, or is there a better (easier) way?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,808

    Default Re: Painting an interior door

    TH767,
    Sounds like you might have a case of bad adhesion of the last paint job to the paint beneath. This is quite common when a latex paint is painted directly over a slick paint, especially oil, without proper preparation and/or priming. If this is the case, no matter what you do, your new paint is only adhered as good as the paint it is over. Stripping might well be in order.

    You can however try to "square off" the badly adhered paint at some point. I would sometimes take a single edge razor blade and score the old paint layer so that the paint would stop peeling at that point. Feather the edge carefully with sandpaper and spackle the edge to hide the ridge of paint. Then prime, paint and keep your fingers crossed that the new paint does not break the bond of the old paint layer while drying.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Painting an interior door

    ordjen,

    thanks for the info. any ideas on a chemical product that will strip the paint without settling too deep in the pours of the wood and prevent the door from being repainted?
    thanks again

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,808

    Default Re: Painting an interior door

    Th767,

    Chemical strippers don't normally disturb the grain of the door so that new paint could not be applied. Unfortunately, there are a lot of strippers on the market and not all work equally well on all paints and finishes. It is kind of hit and miss trial. I used to keep several brands in my shop and tried several until I found the best one for the surface I was working on. I found BIX to generally be a good stripper. You need a space where you can make a bit of a mess and the space should be reasonably warm as cold slows down the chemical reaction. Just follow the directions on the can.

    After you get the paint off and the surface cleaned and sanded, prime the door with a good oil enamel undercoater followed by two good coats of oil enamel if brushing. Latexes are very hard to use and get good results with a brush, but can give good results if sprayed.

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