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  1. #1

    Default Black Front Door - DANGER???

    Is there any truth to the myth that a black front door, either wood or fiberglass, absorbs too much heat and will eventually crack?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    If the door faces south or west........and has no porch roof, shade canopy, etc. to prevent the sun from directly striking that door........then the answer is "yes"......black or any dark color would most likely be a problematic/poor choice.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    4

    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    Many door manufacturers specifically state that the door warranty is void if damage results from using dark colored paints on the exterior of the door.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    So, I have an old wooden door, original 1941 to the house. It has no roof over it, but it faces north. I like the look of a black or dark painted door. Maybe I can talk my wife into red . . .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    21

    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    Facing North is good. Much better than south or west.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    Teacherman,

    If the door faces north......I suspect you'd be fine with most any color of choice. No sun = no solar-heat-gain on the exterior of the door.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    Could I paint the inside of the door black as well, or am I just pressing my luck now?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Black Front Door - DANGER???

    Sure you can paint the inside black. The interior color won't create a problem as far as warping/stressing the door........so long as you don't have some humongous skylight that allows the sun to strike the interior of the door for prolonged periods of time every day.

    A large humidity differential can also cause problems with WOOD doors. For instance, if you live in a locale that gets hot and humid in the summer and you AC the interior of the house.....the door would "respond" to this humidity differential. Consequently, it might warp some and not fit/seal quite the same during the summer as it would during the winter months when humidity levels would tend to more even on both sides.

    There isn't much you can do about this phenomenon other than use a type of finish on both sides that resists/slows down the passage of water vapor. Reactive finishes/paints (oil-based) resist the transmission of water vapor much better than coalecsing finishes do(waterborne/latex).

    If you're overcoating a previously finished/painted wood door and don't know for sure what is on it as regards OB or WB......the safest route would be to strip the door first and then re-prime, then re-finish/re-paint. Latex (waterborne) finishes will usually survive well over existing OB finishes/paints, but OB over WB is usually a no-no. The last thing you want to do is to create sandwich of OB/WB/OB.......or vice-versa. If you do that, the finish/paint will almost assuredly start to peel off in a year or so.
    Last edited by goldhiller; 09-05-2007 at 10:32 PM.

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