+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Building an Interior Wall

    Hi,
    I'm framing in a newly installed gas fireplace and when I went to attach the top plates to the rafters in the ceiling, I discovered that the ceiling had acutally been dropped about 4 inches! So there is half inch drywall - 2 inches or so airspace, old quarter inch drywall and then ceiling joists.
    Do I just rely on the drywall and forget it? Should I use construction adhesive to attach the top plate to the ceiling? Use 7+ inch screws to get to the ceiling joists? Cut out the dropped ceiling(gawd, please no!)and bring the framing up to the old ceiling? The frame is basically a three sided box 2 feet deep, 4 feet wide and 8 feet high.

    thanks all

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Building an Interior Wall

    Cut out the dropped ceiling(gawd, please no!)and bring the framing up to the old ceiling?
    LOL ....

    That would be the strongest method .... however .... if you are fastening the bottom plates securely to the floor and the 2 side walls to a existing rigid backwall then using some construction adhesive and drywall anchors for the top plate will work.
    This will depend on what you will be using for a covering over the studs ... example ... drywall and stone or brick .... then hang a 50 inch plasma .... the top might be a little shakey and you may end up with some cracking at the joint near the ceiling.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    367

    Default Re: Building an Interior Wall

    If you're concerned about the stability of the top plate, you could always cut small holes in all the layers of drywall, above the top plate. Do it neatly so it doesn't show past your new wall surface. Make some blocking that will come from the old rafters and meet the top plate.

    I'd use a lag bold in the rafters and span at least 2 of them (maybe at the mid-point of the wall, and you'll have something solid to fasten the top plate to. It'll depend on how long the wall is too, the other suggestion about letting the floor plate and the two end studs be the only fastening points could work too if the wall's not too long and there's no door in it.

    Good Luck.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •