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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Sioux City, IA
    Posts
    1

    Default My concrete paver steps are settleing underneath my poured concrete slab.

    Back in 2003 I have a 5 foot red/black retaining wall built in my back yard. In the middle of this wall the contractor built 7 stairs out of the pavers and packed down behind each set of stept. A 4 inch thick concrete patio was laid over the top of of the wall and steps. However, in the last 2 years I have noticed that the top 3 rows of steps have concaved a bit leaving a 2-3" gap just underneath the poured concrete. The stairs are still very sturdy but I am at a loss as to what to do about the problem. There are garter snakes living underneath and there are several holes around as the neighboring wall is made out of broken concrete slabs. I have no dirt or mud run off onto the steps, just the settleing. What can I do to fix this so the cement slab won't crack?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    76

    Arrow Re: My concrete paver steps are settleing underneath my poured concrete slab.

    I have not used the service myself, but I have heard that you can lift up the concrete and pour under it.

    There is equipment that can hydraulically lift the concrete slab, inject new concrete, then once hardened, you have a level top slab.

    Anyone know more about this procedure?

    Allison

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Fairfax, VA
    Posts
    76

    Arrow Re: My concrete paver steps are settleing underneath my poured concrete slab.

    The process that I described to you before is called "concrete jacking."

    Here is an excerpt from an article I read on the topic...

    "If your concrete is sinking. there is a very good possibility that the concrete slab was installed on poorly compacted fill dirt. Sub-surface erosion and shrinking soils are also possibilities.

    If you are fortunate enough to have a slabjacker in your area, you should not have to replace the concrete. These individuals can float a slab back to its original position by pumping a mixture of sand, cement, fly ash, and other additives beneath your slab.

    They simply drill strategically placed holes into the slab. Using a portable pump and flexible hoses, they fill these holes with the special mixture. Lifting a slab using this method can often be accomplished in a few hours.

    Often the cost to perform this service is less than half that of replacing a new slab."

    Hope this helps.

    Allison

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