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  1. #1
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    May 2008
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    Default How do I remove this faucet?

    I've got what looks to be an old faucet for my laundry tub. I want to replace the tub with a newer one, but the new one uses hoses. I have to get this thing off of the water lines in order to use the new one, but just not sure how to remove it. Here's some pictures of it:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/7214611...7608200919732/

    Thanks,

    Robear

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Default Re: How do I remove this faucet?

    It's soldered (or, as plumbers say, "sweated") on. You'll need a propane torch or tubing cutter to remove it. If you don't have any experience soldering pipes and don't plan to do any in the future, just use a mini tubing cutter to cut the pipe. Don't use a hacksaw. Attach a shutoff valve (properly called a "stop") that uses a 1/2" compression fitting to the pipe to which you can attach the hoses. Use a piece of 180-grit sandpaper, steel wool, or emery cloth to shine up the pipe before you attach the shutoff valve or you'll be sure to have leaks.

    Mini tubing cutter
    Straight shutoff valve
    Right-angle shutoff valve

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How do I remove this faucet?

    On second look, I think I see a dent in the pipe. Make sure you cut it off above the dent. It needs to be clean and smooth where the joint is made.

    Soldering pipes isn't that difficult. The steps are thus:
    1. Make sure the pipe is cut square and free of burrs. Clean the pipe using abrasive cloth, and the fitting using a wire brush made for the purpose.
    2. Apply flux to both the pipe and the fitting, making sure there is complete coverage where the pipe and fitting meet.
    3. Heat the pipe until solder touched to the pipe melts. Keep applying solder until it drips from the fitting. WARNING: do not melt the solder with the torch. In order for the solder to flow into the joint and bond with the pipe, the joint must be hot enough to melt the solder. The first time you do this, it will seem to require more solder than you think appropriate.
    4. Before the solder cools, use an old cotton rag to wipe the joint. Don't disturb the joint until the solder cools, this will only be a few seconds.


    I'd suggest practicing on some scrap pipe & fittings first. It takes a bit to get the technique down. After you're done with your practice, heat up the joint again and use a pair of pliers to pull the joint apart. Both the joint and fitting should be completely covered with solder where they meet.

    Make sure you use lead-free plumbing solder, and plumbing flux. Don't use other stuff; it's not safe for humans.
    Last edited by Fencepost; 10-20-2008 at 11:03 AM.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How do I remove this faucet?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    It's soldered (or, as plumbers say, "sweated") on. You'll need a propane torch or tubing cutter to remove it. If you don't have any experience soldering pipes and don't plan to do any in the future, just use a mini tubing cutter to cut the pipe. Don't use a hacksaw. Attach a shutoff valve (properly called a "stop") that uses a 1/2" compression fitting to the pipe to which you can attach the hoses. Use a piece of 180-grit sandpaper, steel wool, or emery cloth to shine up the pipe before you attach the shutoff valve or you'll be sure to have leaks.

    Mini tubing cutter
    Straight shutoff valve
    Right-angle shutoff valve
    while using a tubing cutter is easy to use ... it's curious why you say "Don't use a hacksaw" ?
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    6,480

    Default Re: How do I remove this faucet?

    I would caution against just whacking the lines and installing compression anglestops. From the looks of it, this faucet is fed from the top, the faucet itself is attached tot he sink (nuts underneath the sink flange ). Unless your new faucet is of the same relative design - top fed - then you're going to have to reroute the pipes under the sink OR use extremely long supply hoses to reach from where you cut the lines and install the anglestops to the underside of the sink flange where the new faucet will be fed from.

    As was mentioned, sweating new copper fittings and pipe is pretty darned easy. You'll need a torch - preferably using mapp gas (burns hotter than propane ). Turn off the water at the main and the water heater and drain down the lines before cutting them. A hacksaw will suffice if you don't have a mini-tubing cutter, you'll just have to scrap or sand off the burrs from cutting. Be sure to clean any tailings out of the inside of the pipe as well.

    Another tip - Cut and dry fit all your connections first to make sure everything lines up where you want it. From there you disassemble, apply the flux, and reassemble. When you start sweating the joints, apply the heat to one side of the joint and hold the solder against the other, when the solder flows, it will "pucker" all the way around the joint. When you're done, wipe down the joints and the pipe to remove any excess flux because the excess will cause corrosion and possible problems down the road.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    15

    Default Re: How do I remove this faucet?

    Thanks for the help guys. You guessed correctly A. Spruce, the water lines are fed from the top. The new tub that I bought is one of those All-in-one tub kits from Lowe's, so the water lines that came with it are not very long (about 2 feet) and are fed from underneath the sink. The old faucet actually isn't attached to the sink; there is a bolt that sticks out of the faucet that sits on top of the sink. As you can imagine, it's about as stable as stacking dominoes on end.

    I don't have a hacksaw or mini cutter (sort of destroyed the mini-hacksaw I had while cutting for my storm door) so I'll probably be picking up both. I think the mini cutter looks easier because I'll have a better chance of cutting straight.

    Fencepost, I'll check to see if that is a dent in the line. It might be paint or some other miscelleaneous crap. The house was pretty filthy and this tub took the brunt of it all.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How do I remove this faucet?

    The only reason for not using a hacksaw is because it gives a jagged cut that must be filed. Besides that, it'll be a bear to hold the pipe steady while you're hacking away, and you probably can't get a full stroke on the saw. The mini cutter is useful because there may not be enough room to swing a normal sized cutter all the way around the pipe.

    Some more hints:
    1. Wear gloves & eye protection.
    2. When using a tubing cutter, make sure the pipe is clean. Debris can chip the cutting wheel.
    3. Make a couple of turns, tighten it with your fingers, make a couple more turns, tighten it some more. Don't try to cut off the pipe in one pass.
    4. After cutting the pipe, ream the inside with a file, large screwdriver, pliers, or a reaming tool. This removes the burr on the inside of the pipe.
    5. It's easier to show someone how to solder than tell them, so may good fortune be yours in interpreting our descriptions.

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