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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,798

    Default Re: GFCI Outlet Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
    My apologies to JLMCDaniel and Canuk. You are right. Overloads are corrected by circuit breaker. But, let me explain. Sometimes ladies use a
    dryer for their hair and the heavy amperes the dryer has does not kick the circuit breaker off. Then, I install a GFCI and it kicks out. In theory you are right. But sometimes the circuit breaker is old and does not kick off.
    You never have to apologize for expressing an opinion.
    It should be pointed out that inductive and capacitive loads affect current flow, capacitors cause time delays, and inductive loads cause forward and reverse EMF. Both cause the imbalance in current flow on the hot and common and can cause GFCI's to trip. A hair dryer is a combination of resistive load (the heater) and inductive load (the blower motor). That is what trips the GFCI not and overload. All GFCI receptacles that I have seen, although configured as 15 amp outlets, are designed to carry 20 amp, that is expressed as the pass through current rating of the unit.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lakeland ,MN
    Posts
    356

    Default Re: GFCI Outlet Problems

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    You never have to apologize for expressing an opinion.
    It should be pointed out that inductive and capacitive loads affect current flow, capacitors cause time delays, and inductive loads cause forward and reverse EMF. Both cause the imbalance in current flow on the hot and common and can cause GFCI's to trip. A hair dryer is a combination of resistive load (the heater) and inductive load (the blower motor). That is what trips the GFCI not and overload. All GFCI receptacles that I have seen, although configured as 15 amp outlets, are designed to carry 20 amp, that is expressed as the pass through current rating of the unit.
    Jack
    Over the years I have trouble shot many a GFI problems. One overlooked Item are hair dryers left un-covered in the bathrrom tend to collect powder, skin particles, and moisture. The moisture can cause a GFI to trip. The cords often get twisted during use and can also damage the insulation which inturn trip a GFI if damp. Even though this wasn't a concern of the OP I thought I would point this over looked item.
    Harry

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