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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default How to reduce splash back onto siding?

    We have built a cabin (24' x 36' single story on slab foundation) in an area that gets a decent amount of rain, (Northwestern Wisconsin).

    The cabin has Western Red Cedar siding that we are going to sand, stain and seal. We are going to install gutters but want to also use some sort of method to eliminate splash-back onto the siding from diagonal rain and rain that isn't captured well by the gutters. The lowest siding board is about 6-8" from the ground, (see pictures).

    Currently there is a slight slope of the grade leading away from the cabin. There is currently only a dirt cover, no grass, etc., surrounding the foundation.

    Can we slope the grade away from the foundation or will that lower the insulation affects from the ground cover?

    What degree of slope should the grade have?

    What would be the best type of ground cover to have to reduce splash-back, (e.g. brick laid at a 40 degree angle, crushed stone, pea gravel)?

    Should we dig out some of the ground cover, further away from the foundation, to create more of a slope?

    Thanks for any help you can give in advance.

    Tim
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,481

    Default Re: How to reduce splash back onto siding?

    The way to reduce backsplash is to install a surface that absorbs the rain and gutter overflow, rather than letting it bounce back and onto the house. Wood chips or bark will absorb and redirect water. If you don't like the natural look and/or won't have plants and bushes, then gravel will work as well, though rock being hard, it will still allow some splash back.

    You always want to grade the soil so that it slopes away from the structure. I'd follow the rule of thumb that is used for drain systems and concrete slabs, and that's 1/4" per foot, though if you've got good percolative soil, then you can get away with much less. The harder the soil or surface you install, the more imperative it is to have the 1/4" per foot guideline.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

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