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  1. #11
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    Mar 2009
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    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    Howdy, look up between the metal duct and the outside wall at the floor joists are they notched and only part of the joist sitting on top of the wall plate? Or is the entire floor joist sitting on the wall top plate( top plate the horizontal 2 by on top of the knee wall studs)? In your photo the arrow points to the back wall as the sloping down direction if this is true remove the sheer wall to reveal the knee wall there too. Check for level- the cement foundation that the knee wall sits on and the the top plate of the knee wall. in both directions from the corner use a 4' or longer level then write back...

  2. #12
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    Mar 2010
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    Canada
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    86

    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    Quote Originally Posted by DIY1925 View Post
    So i pulled back the OSB (says OSB on it ) and i got some pictures. The studs and sill are in fine condition so no worries about rot. So what are my options for jacking this thing up an inch or so? Is it possibble just place a jack next to one of the studs, pull out the nail connecting it to the sill and raise it an inch or so (doing the same on the otherside at the same time/rate)?

    Oh boy, now there's an open can of worms.
    The picture does quite show the complete area , but, I would suspect the living room is an addition at some point?
    Is the ground level on the outside below the levelof this knee wall ?
    There's a fair bit of moisture as seen by the discolored lumber.
    Somehow I suspect none of the lumber is pressure treated and there may be some rot issues which might explain some of the drop on that side.

  3. #13
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    Mar 2009
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    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    Howdy again the photos really help now. Looking at them the cement foundation was not poured level and thus everything above it reflects it. So depending on how handy you are one can jack up the top plate of the knee wall and take most of the settlement out of the floor. First remove more of the osb on the wall that is still covered so we can see how the top plate looks. Measure the length of the studs in the knee wall so if you later buy the screw pole basement jacks you will know what size you need. Is the grade of the dirt out side of this corner 6" below the wood on the foundation? It is important that the soils do not touch these framing members on the foundation. Does the yard slope away from this corner? Still need to know how those floor joists are installed at the knee wall too.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    7

    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    Hey everyone, thanks for the input. I'll get back under there tonight hopefully and get you some more details. I'm working 12 hour days right now so its been slow going getting time together. outside of the house the ground is level and the dirt is at least six inches below the framing (although this may have not always been the case since it was a rental and not always well maintained, as you can see in the photo some morning glory worked its way up through the siding and framing in the past) Also living room is not an addition, orignal to the house. I'll get some photos of the joists meeting the wall framing. Thanks!
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    Last edited by DIY1925; 02-08-2011 at 01:49 PM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    Howdy if you live where the ground freezes i would recommend digging down next to the cement foundation to see if it extends into the soil up to 4 feet. Be sure not to dig a hole under the foundation and re fill it when your done. The soil clearance is to avoid insect and rot damages.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    hey everyone, i removed more of the osb and took picks of the joists connecting with the top plate. Let me know if you think this changes anything but right now i'm thinking i'll just jack up the top plate. If i jack up the top plate i need to cut the studs down below the top plate correct? or should i just try to pull out the nails that attach the studs to the sill?

    As for the question about the ground freezing i do live in washington state so a couple times during the winter temps do dip below freezing. The foundation extends far beyond 4 inches into the ground though. In the first picture i posted from the basement the dirt level on the opposite side of the walls is about 6 inches from the top of the foundation. So about 4-5 feet of my basement is dug into the earth, its not just resting on the top. This is why the OSB in those pics is only a couple inches tall since the majority of the wall is my foundation wall and then just a couple feet of studs to complete the basement (which only has a height of 7 feet anyways).

    Thanks for the help guys, i really appreciate the input.


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    Last edited by DIY1925; 02-08-2011 at 01:50 PM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: 12 inch drop over 2 inches

    Howdy the phots helps.
    These are the jacks i was referring too.

    http://www.qualitywayproducts.com/te...FRgsawodG0-sHA

    Included the page so you can see what they look like. RThe box stores and hardware stores carry some.
    I would have a contractor come and look and bid the job to raise the floor unless comfortable with shoring and raising the floor and wall too.

    In my house about 8 inches from where the floor joist meet the stud wall i made the dirt level and made it about 1.5 foot wide set a 4 by 6 by 8' on the dirt and jacks on the beam 2 foot apart.Then set another 4 by 6 by 8' on top and slowly screwed the jacks up until i took the slump out of the floor and then sister ed in knee wall studs an removed the jacks. However a contractor may be able to jack the joist up an install sims instead. So get a few bids and pick the estimators brains about how an what they would do..

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