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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    Use glass blocks to fill or partially fill the open spaces

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    near St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    166

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    You want to limit sound but get light and ventilation in the room. The limiting-sound-and getting-ventilation-part (from the window openings) are going to fight each other. If you have ventilation (through the windows) then you are going to get the sound.

    It sounds like the windows are only an issue when company is at the apartment due to lack of privacy. For that I like MJCo’s idea. It is simple, quick, and gives you the privacy you need.

    Another option along those lines is to have heavy roman shades (or similar shades) on both sides of the openings. The shades would fit on the outside of the opening and would extend past the opening by at least an inch. When you have company you could simply lower the shades on one or both sides. That way your “privacy guard” is in place and you don’t have to store any temporary items (Styrofoam, painting, dressing screen). When not needed it is pulled up and is out of the way. Or you might want louvered shutters on one side. That way you have more options: (1) shade up and shutter open (max light and ventilation); (2) shade down and shutter closed (max privacy, especially if you can latch the shutters); (3) shutters closed and shade up (you can regulate how much sunlight gets into the room by adjusting the louvers). You could also have the shutters open and the shade down but I don’t really see any advantage to that.

    Sherry

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    A different kind of solution using minimal tools and readily available products....What about using plexiglass? Line the inside of the window frame with 1x4's cut to size (Stain or paint them with your finish of choice). Determine how many 3" to 4"wide(the measurement of the window will determine what works best for you) panels of plexi will fit horizontally in the opening. Cut (they will do this at the store) the plexiglass so that it fits snugly across the opening. Nail/Glue a square dowel to the two vertical sides of the frame on the living room side flush with the living room wall. Permanently attach every other plexi panel to the dowel on the bedroom side. These are your "fixed pieces". Then create a "moving piece" by building a simple square frame from the same size square dowel and attach the plexi pieces that will fit in the openings created on the "fixed" side. This will give you frames on the outside of both sides of the window with the ability to push the "moving side" into the "fixed side" to help cut out noise and to pull it back towards the bedroom side to allow for ventilation when guests are gone. As for visual privacy, you can frost the plexi with any number of fun designs or just frost it completely before you fix it to the frames and this will allow light in but keep prying eyes out. You can also attach simple handles on the outside of the "moving" piece to aid with the in and out of it all. If you're feeling really handy you can add a guide rail and a groove for the "moving" piece to slide along.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    I read the all the threads in hopes that I wouldn't be throwing something out there that had been thrown already a couple hundred times. First of all it sounds like if you're looking for permanent, the glass blocks idea is the way to go. It'd probably even be pretty. When I read the problem the first thing that came to mind was to grab a two same size canvases (same as the window and each other) Slap what ever you like on them, get some carpet remnants (to block the sound) to sandwich in between them, nail them together with finishing nails I think they're called and hang the whole thing on the wall like art when not in use. Then when company drops by you can pull them off the wall and balance or wedge (this part needs a little work, getting them to stay in place). You'd give up like when the folks are over but you gain nifty reversible artwork. Good luck.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    Shallow unobtrusive or decorative transom windows at ceiling/wall edge that open for ventilation, but seal well for sound abatement would provide light and give you most of your wall back.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    367

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    I'd go with the glass block idea from Karenduhe. I've used them in a door opening that we no longer wanted but needed light. I used 4" blocks and they fit the opening just right with a 1/2" mortar joint. If your opening isn't just the right size for the blocks, you can always build it out on the sides, with wood and paint the fillers, then use the blocks. It'll cut the noise, give you light, and they're mottled so there's privacy. You could always hang a curtain, maybe all the way to the floor, for a little effect.

    Good Luck.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    maybe try a shoji type screen but only in the cutout?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    4

    Smile Re: Help TOH editor Alex Bandon solve her bedroom design dilemma

    I would use glass block. There are quite a bit of sizes and styles and they are very inexpensive. You would have complete privacy yet still retain your sunlight.A do-it-yourself store would be the least expensive way to go. However, the "venting" concern I'm not as sure about.
    Another idea would be to install sliding windows that have the blinds between the panes. You would have both ventilation and privacy. =) Good-luck!

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