+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Default No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    Just like the previous post. My shower has lost a lot of pressure. The other faucets in the house seem unaffected. The pressure seemed to have been lost all of a sudden one day a few weeks ago. I thought it was the shower head. The shower head is a hand held shower head with a 3ft hose. I replaced it with another hand held and still little pressure. I put a generic shower head on and the pressure seemed normal, but with the hand held there is very little pressure. The faucet is a Delta with a single lever pull. I've not replaced this since purchasing the house 7 years ago. But I did replace the valve seats a few weeks before losing pressure. Is my next step to replace the faucet?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,160

    Default Re: No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    Has any other work been done on the plumbing system just prior to the pressure drop in the shower? Short of this scenario, today's shower heads and hand held units have restrictors in them that reduce the flow but maintain "pressure". IMHO, shower quality is greatly reduced with "water saver" type devices installed. I don't believe that a longer shower with less pressure saves much when one must shower longer to get wet and rinse.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    To add a bit to Sprucey's post....

    These restrictors are usually little plastic (or sometimes rubber) discs with a small hole in them and are located either in the end of the hose you screw to the shower arm sticking out of the wall...or are located where the hose connects to the showerhead. They are easily removed....usually.

  4. #4

    Default Re: No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    Yeah, I know all about that extra time rinsing. But I did try to remove the restrictor on the new head when I installed it, but it is pressed into the metal hose housing. I was afraid I'd break it. Should I still try it? Knowing that I'll be out another shower head if I do a tool man taylor on it?

  5. #5

    Default Re: No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    Oh to answer your question about recent plumbing. No recent plumbing, but I noticed that the pressure dropped on the day that my kids were playing in the yard with a "Slip slide". The water ran for about 3 hours. Yes, I'm on a well. I was afraid that the pressure tank may be worn out, but the pressure doesn't seem to be affected else where in the house. Thoughts?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,160

    Default Re: No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Spokespinner View Post
    Yeah, I know all about that extra time rinsing. But I did try to remove the restrictor on the new head when I installed it, but it is pressed into the metal hose housing. I was afraid I'd break it. Should I still try it? Knowing that I'll be out another shower head if I do a tool man taylor on it?
    Instead of removing the restrictor you could drill it out. I've done that with a number of cheaper shower heads that are one piece molded plastic. Worked like a charm.

    I don't have experience with wells or pressure tanks to comment on your last post. Considering that the shower is the only thing that is seemingly affected, I would guess that debris got drawn up and found it's way to the shower. It's possible that corrosion inside the pipe has broken loose and plugged the valve inlet and that it's not a shower head problem at all. You might try turning the water on in the shower full blast without the hose or head attached to see what the pressure is like as well as maybe blow any lodged debris out of the valve. It's worth a shot.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: No Water Pressure in Shower 2

    On a well, huh? That could change things quite a bit in light of when this happened.

    So....several questions for ya.

    Is this shower on the 2nd floor of the house?

    Jet pump or submersible?

    Can you hear/discern when the pump is running and for how long? (Is it located where you can hear it?)

    240 or 120 VAC pump motor? (Newer 240 pumps would have a control box hanging on the wall labeled that it is a wellpump controller. 240 would *likely* have three wires headed down the well casing while a 120 would have just two wires. However.... really old 240s might have only two wires also. Testing the wires with a meter is the surest way to determine what gives. But...if you see the controller box on the wall....it's a 240 pump.)


    Any idea how close to the bottom of your well that the pump hangs? (or foot-valve is located in the instance of a jet pump instead of a submersible)

    Galvanized (single compartment tank) or a bladder type tank (usually painted with the supply pipe emerging from under the tank bottom) ?

    Any whole house filters in the line?

    There are a few "well-related" things that could be causing this problem...particulary so if the shower in question is on the second floor.

    I'll touch on just one possibility for now unitl we have more info. And that is....a faulty pressure switch on a three-wire or 240 well-pump. When that pressure switch kicks in/trips to start the pump.....there are two sets of contacts inside that must make contact to deliver full current to the pump. Often enough... when these switches are asked to pump water for extended periods of time without much (if any) rest...the contacts become heavily carboned over and/or worn. If one set can no longer make full contact as a result....on a 240 pump....that pump will still run on the one remaining good leg....but will be seriously hampered in delivering water because the pump won't run at full RPM. This *may* be what's happened. If the switch already had some age on it...pumping water for the kids that day may have taken one set of contacts over the edge...so to speak. If so....a new pressure switch would be the remedy. $15 or so for the part. (My BIL did the same thing to a pressure switch this summer filling his swimming pool. Guess who got to find the problem and fix it. <G>)

    (You may also have a water-logged pressure tank at the moment which would exacerbate the low presssure and flow to the shower if the pump is running at reduced RPM. That too is *likely* easy to remedy without a new tank. *If* the tank is water-logged...that would have also caused the pressure switch to kick in and out far more frequently than it should have...and added to the wear on the contacts.)

    There are numerous other possibilities, but I won't go into all of those until we have more info.

    A very useful bit of info would be if you know (or the previous owner or installer of the current pumps knows)...how many gallon a minute is it supposed to deliver...or did it deliver when running right.

    Answers to all of the above questions might be helpful in trying to diagnose over the internet. Still.......no promises.
    Last edited by goldhiller; 09-29-2008 at 10:23 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •