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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010

    Default water pressure changes

    I moved in this 1954 house which has some upgrades but not the plumbing. Pressure runs good as long as no 2 sites are one at the same time. Example when the bath shower is on, and someone flushes the commode or even turns on any other faucet (cold or hot line or both), the shower pressure drops and turns colder too. I had the city do pressure test. This is the reading:
    Street: GPM=18/PSI=60 and house GPM=7/PSI=60. The tech did not give any advise other than noted that it was not the city problem. I guessed the interior plumbing must have deposits. Will 'cleaning' out the pipes solve the problem? Or the only solution is re-plumbing. Should I also consider putting a new line form street to house (which I did not think necessary.)
    Need your advise. I am tired of getting cold showers.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010

    Default Re: water pressure changes

    Chances are pretty good that your plumbing lines are galvanized pipe. If that is the case replacement is the only answer. It could be that some of your pipes have already been replaced with copper or PVC during a remodeling phase, but with a 50+ year old house all galvanized pipes will need to come out. You probably will find that deposits in the pipe are leaving only a pencil size opening for water to flow through. You should not need to replace the line from the street as the flow rate and pressure seem to be acceptable. You need to be experienced in plumbing or atleast work with an experienced person if you contemplating doing the job yourself. There is lots of info on line or in books givening types and sizing of pipes to get the correct flow.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Elyria, Oh.

    Default Re: water pressure changes

    You will have to replumb. Consider Pex. It comes in rolls of different sizes reasonably priced - not like copper. It is also relatively easy to install. The tool kit costs about $150. You can do this as a DIY project whereas you would need experience to do copper as well as a fire safety problem. The newer copper crimping tool put out by Ridgid is about $700 so too expensive for the ordinary DIYer. CPVC is also an alternative. Get a plumbing book and read it well before starting any project. Send your family on vacation for a week because it will take longer then your think.

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