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  1. #31
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by remedialmofo View Post
    ***, I never thought that giving your opinion on an issue would end up with so many board members poking fun
    If we're good for nothing else, we're good for a little fun once the question has been answered. OP asked, everyone offered, now it's the fun part. BTW, you'd have to be familiar with forum history to understand the staple gun and caulk comment. There is a point at which things become absurd, and that's when you'll see the most comments in that direction.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  2. #32
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by remedialmofo View Post
    ***, I never thought that giving your opinion on an issue would end up with so many board members poking fun at you like their still in kindergarten. This board was made to allow people the opportunity to help others with their OPINIONS! I choose to work with certain tools in every trade I do. I am sure our tools look nothing alike and you could spot you own tools a mile away. God knows I care for my tools more than my own girlfriend. With that being said it is perfectly ok to choose the tools you want to work with or not for that matter. But the bottom line is the homeowner that started this thread now has pretty much has all the facts and can choose a coarse of action based on what has been said. This thread should be locked effective immediately hahahahaha Or you could always just poke some more fun!
    sorry wasn't ment to be offensive. our line of humor actually dates back quite a ways dealing with some other threads. Our humor may be warped at times but really our desire is to offer constructive help but at the same time to realize that most people who come here are in diy mode so we try to keep it as simple for them as possible for them both in advice as well as tools to buy. most aren't going to use a dedicated tool like that but only once, so if there is an alternative for them that is still safe and practical then that is what we will try to offer them. there are certain posters who come on here who always complicate things and try to make it sound like only trades people can do anything and anything else will lead to shody workmanship. so we try to add a little humor to bring things into perspective. wasn't ment to be putting anyone down at all. and if you feel that way I apologize.

  3. #33
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by remedialmofo View Post
    This is exactly why you should call a professional to work on any issue that could cause severe damage.
    Absolutely agree .... I'll often state just that ..... when things are not for DIY or are just plain dangerous .... otherwise try and explain what's involved and the person can decide.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  4. #34
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    You've probably never seen a plumber carrying a torque wrench, because the torque wrench that's used isn't a big, honkin' wrench like your mechanic uses. That would be like using a bulldozer to plant a tulip. The torque wrench in question is a small, T-handle device that you can almost hide in your palm. Proper tool for the job and all, you know.

    It's a really good idea to use a torque wrench, not just so that the coupling gets tight enough, but also so that it's not overtightened. Overtightening these clamps can actually damage the rubber coupling and cause it to fail sooner.

    It would be nice if the high-and-mighty "professional plumbers and electricians" on here would actually offer advice instead of constantly harping that only a card-carrying union pipefitter is qualified to do this sort of work.

    And yes, I was a licensed plumber once. And yes, I did use a torque wrench on these fittings. And no, I wasn't union, so I guess there is no possible way in the world I can know what I'm talking about, so you'd better just ignore this whole post.
    Last edited by Fencepost; 09-29-2008 at 10:33 AM.

  5. #35
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fencepost View Post
    You've probably never seen a plumber carrying a torque wrench, because the torque wrench that's used isn't a big, honkin' wrench like your mechanic uses. That would be like using a bulldozer to plant a tulip. The torque wrench in question is a small, T-handle device that you can almost hide in your palm. Proper tool for the job and all, you know.

    It's a really good idea to use a torque wrench, not just so that the coupling gets tight enough, but also so that it's not overtightened. Overtightening these clamps can actually damage the rubber coupling and cause it to fail sooner.

    It would be nice if the high-and-mighty "professional plumbers and electricians" on here would actually offer advice instead of constantly harping that only a card-carrying union pipefitter is qualified to do this sort of work.

    And yes, I was a licensed plumber once. And yes, I did use a torque wrench on these fittings. And no, I wasn't union, so I guess there is no possible way in the world I can know what I'm talking about, so you'd better just ignore this whole post.
    As previously mentioned typically in residential a torque wrench is rarely ( if at all ) used by trades people and isn't checked by inspectors..... based on experience.

    If someone wants to use one .... go for it .... nobody is saying not to.

    Btw .... how often do you have to calibrate the T handled wrench?
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  6. #36
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    One advantage of hiring a licensed, bonded professional is that when they screw up, they have insurance to cover it and are legally obligated to make it right.

    When you screw up, well, your own insurance *might* cover your stupidity.

    It's always a good idea to consider the advice given, and if it seems like more than you are confident handling or you don't understand the advice, by all means call a professional.

  7. #37
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    Feb 2008
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    Memphis, not Egypt
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    183

    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    I do own a no hub torque wrench. Use it every time to finish No-Hub couplings. Had no idea that the bands were intentionally color coded. Maybe I "need" more tools. Now I'm justified. LOL

    I kinda agree with the dude but I also don't know a handful of plumbers that I'd trust to work on my plumbing. And the consumers don't even know enough to know better but still give them work all the time.

    And I bet that price is list and he didn't actually pay that much for them. I'm a Liscenced Plumber and I would buy and use their tool if the job specs called for it. And the inspector will check for leaks but not usually the torque. However an Independent Inspector say on a gov't job or some engineered big commercial or industrial piping job may test it or at least ask to see your tools. And then you better have them or some extra time in the job. 'Cause that does happen. So I say the guy has a very valid point. However no one has yet mentioned that the wye had been cut down to fit in the cut out. Code violation Shhh they'll never know. It'll be fine no need to file a do not ocupy order or anything.

  8. #38
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    Aug 2007
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    1,131

    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    Okay...I'll take back what I said about no one needing a torque wrench for the clamps on a Fernco. Instead, I'll say that I don't need one. Then again, I've been doing things mechanical for about 45 years. I know enough not to use a 1/2 drive ratchet or breaker-bar to tighten a Fernco clamp, but would use a 1/4" drive ratchet. It's easy this way to feel the end-result pressure because it's an appropriate tool for the job at hand. Admittedly, a newbie DIYer may not know which tool is appropriate and may not have a feel for what is adequate pressure and what is too much or too little. For these folks...a dedicated little torque wrench is probably just the ticket.

    Case in point - I have an acquaintance/friend who is the husband of my wife's college roommate. Guy teaches high school English and history…..and is the football coach. He pumps iron every single day. Can currently bench about 420, IIRC. One day his wife asks him to install a new showerhead. Pretty simple job…or should have been. However, Steve has pretty much zero experience in the mechanical arenas of life (other than changing weights on his muscle-building apparatus)…and has lost all concept of his actual strength. Give it all ya got…is about the only way he goes at things. Well……he managed to twist the shower arm completely out of the wall with nothing but his bare hands….... while attempting to change out that showerhead. Didn’t know which way to turn it to unthread the critter, chose the wrong way… and just “gave it his all”. And did he ever. Had to call in a plumber and a tile guy to put things back together again….and it weren’t cheap neither. This, unfortunately, is only one example in a long list of Steve’s “DIY talents” and lack of finesse costing them substantial monies.

    So in conclusion…. Yes, there apparently is a need for these torque wrenches even on simple jobs. But not everyone will need one. I think that’s a fair statement.

    PS- Don't ask Steve to tighten the screws on your eyeglasses.
    Last edited by goldhiller; 10-03-2008 at 09:31 AM.

  9. #39
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    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    We may have lost focus on the original post. The fitting in question is in the garage, at about the lowest possible point. If the coupling isn't properly tightened with the proper torque wrench, so what? If it leaks, it's not going to do any more damage than it already has, which isn't much. Simply put, it's hard to damage concrete with a little drip. And if it REALLY leaks, it'll just run down the driveway to the curb on down the street to the storm drain and out to the creek where it'll kill a couple of fish and cause an ecological disaster of Noahic proportions.

    Nevertheless, the advice is good and may help some other reader.

  10. #40
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    Feb 2008
    Location
    Memphis, not Egypt
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    183

    Default Re: What is this pipe?

    It is an unsanitary nuisance. My torque wrench is set at 60 inch# It cost me $36 I will not name the manufacturer cause I'm notgetting paid to endorse it LOL. The budget brand was $32. It was not that big an investment. Yes, I could use a nut driver and it prolly wouldn't leak. Some one prolly took off the band to clear the drain.
    Last edited by i.m.plummin; 10-06-2008 at 12:15 AM. Reason: its mine

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