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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5

    Question Dampness/efflorescence on basement wall

    Our foundation was built 8 years ago and shortly after backfilling the front wall moved 1/4 inch. Resulting crack/space was filled w/hydraulic cement and sealed to prevent future leaks/problems. Outside block had been sealed w/dryloc before movement (after, it was already backfilled so inaccessible) and modular home was placed on foundation a day or so later. House sits at the bottom of a sloping driveway and hill. The basement walls appear dry if there has been no rain/snow for a significant period of time. However, any amount of rain/snow, and of course particularly if there is a lot of rain/snow, the block on the front wall appears damp and efflorescence forms on the block.

    The majority of the pipes inside the basement have been insulated, and we now have a dehumidifier running round-the-clock.

    The problem appears to be runoff and I'm seeking solutions re: the easiest/most cost-efficient fixes to this problem. I'm assuming we will need to re-grade the front lawn so that it slopes up/away from the house, rather than gradually down toward the house. The road has no drainage system so all rainwater runs down the hill from the road as well. Someone suggested filling the space in front of the basement wall, when we grade it up, with clay as this will act as a filter.

    Any suggestions?!! I'd like to finish the basement someday but first have to resolve this moisture issue.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Dampness/efflorescence on basement wall

    Outside block had been sealed w/dryloc before movement (after, it was already backfilled so inaccessible)
    This is a bit confusing.




    the block on the front wall appears damp and efflorescence forms on the block.
    If the walls on the outside of the foundation were covered with dri-lock shows this isn't a very good product. They should have covered with a professional damp proof or water proof material.

    You didn't say if there was any perimeter drain system installed for the foundation. If there wasn't then there definately should have been one installed. Yes the grade should be sloped away from the house. The clay isn't so much a filter but more that it allows the water to run off instead of draing right through.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Dampness/efflorescence on basement wall

    Block was set, then sealed with driloc (or a similar product). Excavator backfilled, which caused a portion of the block to move forward approx. 1/4 inch. The space was filled w/hydraulic cement to prevent future leakage.

    There is a perimeter drain system. The moisture issue appears to be from the runoff. As in my original email, I'm wondering what the options are in addition to regrading.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Dampness/efflorescence on basement wall

    Since there is a perimeter drain and you only have a problem in one area where the ground slopes toward the house then you need to correct this grade and direct the water away.
    You certainly don't want the grade around the house to slope toward it. You need to have it slope away preventing water to soak the ground near the foundation.
    It might be the drain system can't handle the amount of water being directed toward the house or the drain isn't working properly at this area.
    I would say to take care of sloping the grade away from the house and if you still have problems then probably there's an issue with the drain in this area.

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