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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1

    Angry 20+ years of slow running hot water

    i now live in my dad's house. for 20 plus year thete has been very slow running hot water. the cold water runs fast-no problem. i don't want to have too re pipe this whole house. that would be costly. what can be done about the slow running hot water or what could be the problem.

    please help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: 20+ years of slow running hot water

    i guess the 1st thing would to be sure the shut off valve for the hot water is open full and not a broken off washer..etc

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    6,486

    Default Re: 20+ years of slow running hot water

    Make sure all the supply valves are all open fully (at the street main, the house main, the hot water heater or boiler or both, all of the sink angle stops, etc). If the problem is in one or two fixtures and no where else, then it's probably an obstruction within the valve. If the water heater has been replaced, then sediments and debris could have been dislodged within the piping and is now blocking the valves, requiring the valves be taken apart and cleaned.

    Clean all your aerators and shower heads. Even though your cold pressure is fine, aerators do collect debris and will reduce the pressure.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: 20+ years of slow running hot water

    Quote Originally Posted by cburgess76 View Post
    i now live in my dad's house. for 20 plus year thete has been very slow running hot water. the cold water runs fast-no problem. i don't want to have too re pipe this whole house. that would be costly. what can be done about the slow running hot water or what could be the problem.

    please help
    rusty or scaled up galvanized pipes. if so no fix except replace them. probably not a quick cheap fix for a 20 year old complaint. if the line going into the water heater is small but the line coming out is big can have problem. do you have a pump well or city water pressure? do you have a water softner or other water treatment system or filter only on the hot water?

    p.s. the previous owner of our house had changed the water heater and piped it to bend down and go straight into the water heater, when we had plumber review it he changed the pipe connection to be straight over head then do what he called a drop this also made things work better flow wise to make the hot water more equal force as the cold water through the pipes to the faucets.
    Last edited by Blue RidgeParkway; 09-04-2008 at 12:10 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    32

    Default Re: 20+ years of slow running hot water

    I would also vote for scaling of the pipes and/or WH changeout releasing sediment that hit the valves or any other pipeline reductions. If you live, as I do, in a high-calcium area (like the desert SW) then the heating of water will solidify that calcium on the pipes/valves/etc, which could substantially reduce flow. Since it involves heated water, it only affects the hot side. It is especially problematic in the tank, and so if your energy bills are pretty high for the fuel that does heat the water, then a new tank is in order.
    Replacing a tank that did have lots of sediment could have released that sediment to run downstream & clog up valves & reductions. That could be calcium-related or just any other sediment.
    So, in summary, if the tank is new, I would look to the pipes. If it is original, I would look to the tank. If it has been ongoing (before & after tank replacement) I would start disassembling valves.
    But, to be truthful, I redid my entire house, pulling out the galvanized and replacing with PEX home-run style (one run to each room, not one to each fixture) and I spent MAYBE $300 AND I have better tasting water, no pressure-influencing problems when showering, and the hot takes significantly less time to get to the tap, since I have smaller diameter 1/2" lines instead of a massive 1" trunk running down the center of the house (1" is 4X the volume of 1/2" so water moves 4X slower through, so it takes 4X longer to get hot to the tap)
    Of course, my state lets you DIY plumbing like this, so YMMV.

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