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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Default new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    I am installing new crown molding in my great room. I have existing kitchen cabinets with crown molding at the top. The new crown molding needs to meet the existing cabinet crown molding. The cabinet crown molding is stained alder, the room crown molding is a bit larger and is MDF that I will paint. I'm just an amateur and don't know how to cut the new molding with the exact profile to mate with the existing molding. Any suggestions on how to do this? Are there any articles or books that explain how this should be done?

    Thanks,

    -Steve

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    7,096

    Default Re: new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    Being different sizes, there's no way to cut to make them mate up. Use a corner block to define the transition between the two. Google corner block if you're not sure what they are.

    It doesn't matter that one is stained and one is painted, that will marry just fine, it is the size difference that will be the problem, hence the corner block.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    2

    Default Re: new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    Thanks for the info A. I will certainly look into the corner block idea, I had not considered that.

    Is there any way to cope one crown molding into the other when they are different sizes? Or is that only for Michelangelo? If I decide to hire an expert to come in and handle this transition how would he do it?

    Thanks,

    -Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Northern Virginia
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    1,185

    Default Re: new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    It's a bit of a skill to cope one molding into a different one, but eminently do-able. You first should procure a set of scribes, but a compass like you used in 7th grade geometry will do. Hold a short length of the new crown up so that it contacts the cabinet crown. Set the scribes to the distance of the largest part of the gap. Hold the scribes in an horizontal plane, and trace the cursor (pointy end) across the cabinet molding while the pencil end transfers its profile to the new crown. Visualize how the coping saw needs to cut straight back into the new wood to allow it to conform to the cabinet crown. Cut this line. Try the fit and correct the cut by paring away more material as required.
    S_M
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    7,096

    Default Re: new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    I personally would just use a corner block and be done with it. IMHO, coping a small molding into a larger one or visa-versa won't look all that good. Personal tastes must prevail, so I won't talk you out of it.

    S_M covered the coping aspect pretty good. I would use a couple of scraps to practice and once you've got the cut down, transfer it to the actual piece of molding. This will be much easier than trying to hold up a big long chunk of trim with one hand while trying to scribe it with the other.
    I suffer from CDO ... Its like OCD, but in alphabetical order, LIKE IT SHOULD BE!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    corner block would probably be best, but what if you return the new molding an inch or so away from the cabinet molding? Not sure how that would look.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default Re: new crown molding meets existing cabinet crown molding

    corner block would probably be best, but what if you return the new molding an inch or so away from the cabinet molding? Not sure how that would look.

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