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Thread: Door Plans

  1. #1
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    Feb 2010
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    Default Door Plans

    Does anyone have any sites where you can purchase raised panel door plans. I have a house that I just bought and need to replace 23 doors with solid doors. Figured it was much cheaper to build than but all of them.
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    It won't necessarily be cheaper, particularly if you factor in special tooling needed for the job.

    Google is your friend.
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  3. #3
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    Feb 2010
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    Thanks for your reply.
    I have most of the equipment in my shop. I have made raised panel cabinet doors. I would have to enlarge my jigs and buy larger table router bits. I figured I could make the doors for about $75/piece compared to ~$145/piece. So you think it would be more expensive to build my own?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    I don't think any bench top router or table is going to handle the cuts required for the typical raised panel door, you will need a shaper for that. Keep in mind that an interior door is 1-3/8" thick, exterior doors are 1-3/4" thick. When putting the profiles on the rails and stiles, you're using a very large cutter and removing a lot of material in one pass, that is the reason for the shaper - 220v, cutters stack on spindle, has substantial table and fence system. Cutters for raised door panels will be large as well.

    Doors are also doweled at the major intersections of the rails and stiles, generally around a 3/4" knurled dowel peg. You're not going to do this with a hand drill. A drill press will work for the stiles, but not for end drilling the rails, for that you're going to either have to make a creative jig for the drill press, or you're going to need a horizontal drilling machine.

    Machinery aside, the only other reasons to do this on your own would be because you would enjoy the experience, or the quality that you can produce is far and above that of mass production. Don't get me wrong, I'm not suggesting that this isn't something you shouldn't be attempting, but when you factor in tooling, material, and time, it will be faster and cheaper to buy the doors in the long run. I too have a shop and I've made my own baseboard and specialty moldings, as well as all kinds of specialty cabinets, doors, and other things. For me it's about quality first, then enjoyment. Icing on the cake is when I can do it cheaper when all is said and done.

    As I said before, Google will be your friend. You will find much better and more in depth information on the exact "how-to" than what can be covered here. You'll have the added benefit of pictures which will direct you to the types of cutters, materials, and final product to be watching for.

    With that said, be sure to post the progress of your project, this is something that most of us sawdust makers would enjoy.
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  5. #5
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    Feb 2010
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    5

    Default Re: Door Plans

    Thanks for the advice. You are right it is not just about the money. It is about the adventure. I will keep everyone in the loop. I was wondering if I need to purchase a shaper. I thought maybe my table router could handle it. I guess not. I do have a large drill press though. I will keep searching on Google and let you know what i find out!
    Thanks!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    I have a shaper for sale if you're in the NorCal area.
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  7. #7
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    Northern Virginia
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    Hi,
    A few tools will make the tasks a job rather than an ordeal. You may even end up with usable doors.
    1) long-bed jointer; 8" is best, but a 6" would be acceptable.
    This tool is for taking your rough-sawn stock and turning it into door stock, which must be free from twist and warp.
    2) Finish Planer. Bigger is better. a 15" planer will do all the work you need, esp. if 3 phase/5HP. This is for thicknessing the stock that you have given one flat face to at #1 above.
    3) shaper(s) . I got used to a 1 1/4" sliding table, tilting arbor shaper at the shop I once used. It took the large panel raising bits that made quick work of it, and ran the large coping/sticking setups for rails and stiles. They also make a three-headed shaper where you can have all 3 cutters set up at the same time, but you lose the terrific features of the tilting arbor (which multiplies the usefulness of every single shaper cutter times infinity) and the sliding table, which is superb for end cutting on raised panels. An obvious tradeoff of speed & accuracy vs. flexibility. 240v.
    4) Tablesaw, for ripping stock to width. And a million other things. 240v 3HP minimum.
    5) clamps for panel glue-up and assembly.
    6) Mortiser; if you want M&T doors, sash-making, etc. M&T joints always better in the long run than dowels.
    7) drill press or boring machine for dowels.

    Can you build doors with less gear? yes, but it will take longer, you will have fewer choices as to profiles and details, and with smaller lighter equipment there is the risk of injury from pushing tools and physics beyond limitations.
    S_M
    Remove not the ancient landmark, which your fathers have set.

  8. #8
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    Jun 2007
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    Coventry, RI
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    While a shaper would be very handy for making your doors you could do a lot of the work with a table saw. You would just end up with square edges instead of the profiled edge you normally get using rail and stile bits on a router table or shaper. I made a door for my shed about 5 years ago using nothing more than my table saw and handheld router. It is made of 6/4 cedar and I used tongue and grove cedar for the panel. Keep in mind that you don't have to have the normal 6 panel door you can use your imagination and do something different if you like.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #9
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    Jun 2007
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    They can be made with a router table. May I suggest you check out http://www.freudtools.com/p-208-two-...r-bit-set.aspx

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  10. #10
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Door Plans

    Quote Originally Posted by Sombreuil_mongrel View Post
    2) Finish Planer. Bigger is better. a 15" planer will do all the work you need, esp. if 3 phase/5HP. This is for thicknessing the stock that you have given one flat face to at #1 above.
    Given the choice to do over, I would purchase a surface sander rather than a planer. A sander will do more things, can generally accommodate wider materials, and eliminates tear-out that is the norm with a knife machine. Both machines definitely have their place, but IMHO, most folks would do better with a surface sander than a planer. This is especially true to those who like working with figured wood such as maple that is extremely prone to tear-out. Sappy woods such as pine, a planer is the better choice.
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