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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default non-insulated beach house

    I recently purchased an elevated house on the Tx coast. It is obviously hot and humid here. The house is from 1968 and was a spec (cheap) house. The walls are wood paneling with wood siding on the outside. There is some loose fill but in very poor condition. Also I have a cathedral ceiling in the living room and kitchen it is completely non-insulated.
    This is going to have to be a fairly cheap DIY or mostly DIY project.
    I am thinking about removing the wall paneling (I need to rewire and do some plumbing work anyway, and the cheap paneling is ugly) retrofit hurricane straps, place fiberglass bats and drywall.
    My three questions are
    1. The ceiling... I love the look of the exposed rafters, but it is increadibly hot in the house. I am fairly clueless on what to do.
    Do I need a vapor barrier? What about the ceramic paints on the ceiling?
    2. The walls- again vapor barrier? Can I just stick in the batts, secure and drywall?
    3. Do I need to do anything on the floor, there is a garage and small enclosed room downstairs. Should I add insulation under the sub floor and then add something like the plastic barrier?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,560

    Default Re: non-insulated beach house

    To add to asc2078's post, being that you are on the coast I would recommend closed cell foam insulation rather than fiberglass. It's water proof, seals better, adds to structural integrity, and dosen't have paper backing that is a food source for mold.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    54

    Default Re: non-insulated beach house

    Quote Originally Posted by txestrella View Post
    I recently purchased an elevated house on the Tx coast. It is obviously hot and humid here. The house is from 1968 and was a spec (cheap) house. The walls are wood paneling with wood siding on the outside. There is some loose fill but in very poor condition. Also I have a cathedral ceiling in the living room and kitchen it is completely non-insulated.
    This is going to have to be a fairly cheap DIY or mostly DIY project.
    I am thinking about removing the wall paneling (I need to rewire and do some plumbing work anyway, and the cheap paneling is ugly) retrofit hurricane straps, place fiberglass bats and drywall.
    My three questions are
    1. The ceiling... I love the look of the exposed rafters, but it is increadibly hot in the house. I am fairly clueless on what to do.
    Do I need a vapor barrier? What about the ceramic paints on the ceiling?
    2. The walls- again vapor barrier? Can I just stick in the batts, secure and drywall?
    3. Do I need to do anything on the floor, there is a garage and small enclosed room downstairs. Should I add insulation under the sub floor and then add something like the plastic barrier?
    Vapor barriers for your area should be placed on the outside wall side of the insulation. As a general rule, the vapor barrier should go towards the heated side. Therefore, if you have more cooling days than heating days, as in Texas, the vapor barrier goes out. If you live in a 50-50 area, it's kind of up in the air.

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