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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    1

    Unhappy Brushed Latex Paint on an old dresser

    I was just given an old dresser that had been brush painted with latex wall paint, the issue I am having is it is missing some of the drawer pulls so I was going to replace them. Well after looking closely the pulls had been painted while on the drawers and will not come off without taking lots of paint with them. It is a nice old dresser but I am 9 months pregnant and do not want to deal with chemicals to strip it. Could a light sanding and repaint with low VOC paint look okay or does anyone have any other ideas. Thanks for your help!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,555

    Default Re: Brushed Latex Paint on an old dresser

    Not being able to see the dresser it hard to say if a "light sanding" will do the trick. If you are putting different pulls on it you would at least want to feather the edges for the chipped paint to get a fairly smooth new paint job. You can try going around the old knobs with an exacto knife, utility knife, or razor blade to break the paint junction at the knobs.
    Hope that helps,
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Brushed Latex Paint on an old dresser

    I would add that if/when you encounter these divots around the handle area, you could use some wood filler or spackle to fill in the depressions...*if* they are deep enough to warrant that. If so, let that dry well, then sand it flush to the surrounding area, prime these fills and then paint away. Then again, if there's only one coat of paint on the dresser, filling the divots probably won't be necessary. Feathering the edges of the paint a bit with sandpaper would probably do all that's needed.


    If the current paint job has alot of brush marks in it and this perturbs you, some sanding will be in order to remove those brush marks. If not, then likely you can just clean the surface well with some TSP, followed by a good rinsing...and then perhaps a very light sanding with some 220 grit to give the new coat even better tooth for adhesion.

    When repainting (with latex) you could add some Floetrol to the paint to reduce brush marks, if you're applying by brush again. This will both extend the working of the paint and allow it to lay down flatter (level out) so that brush marks should be less visible.

    It's unlikely that you'd need to use as much Floetrol as the container suggests to get a desirable result. 1/4th as much or less will make a big difference...unless you live in a very arid locale.

    Don't paint in the wind or out in the hot sun as this will cause the paint to dry out rapidly and not have time to level out.

    Floetrol can likely be found at your big-box or a local paint store.
    Last edited by goldhiller; 08-11-2008 at 09:50 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Portland, Oregon, formerly of Chicago
    Posts
    1,580

    Default Re: Brushed Latex Paint on an old dresser

    Alas, truth be told, acrylic paints will never give a satisfying finish on furniture, especially when applied with a brush. Acrylics (latex) do not get hard like an oil or lacquer finish, therefore they do not feather out well. The edges merely roll up while gumming your sandpaper up. Acrlics also always retain a gummy feeling, especially when it is humid out.

    If you are 9 months pregnant, hold out a few weeks til you can strip the piece you like and then refinish with an oil based enamel if brushing. If you don't want to brush the piece, you might consider using spray cans. One trick I use when using spray cans is to heat the can in water from your hot water tap. Heat builds up the pressure in the can and makes them spray better. Also, all oil paints (which is what probably is in the can) become more viscous and flow better when heated. Spray using linear strokes overlapping about 50% so as to keep a flowing wet edge.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Brushed Latex Paint on an old dresser

    Quote Originally Posted by ordjen View Post
    Alas, truth be told, acrylic paints will never give a satisfying finish on furniture, especially when applied with a brush. Acrylics (latex) do not get hard like an oil or lacquer finish, therefore they do not feather out well. The edges merely roll up while gumming your sandpaper up. Acrlics also always retain a gummy feeling, especially when it is humid out.

    If you are 9 months pregnant, hold out a few weeks til you can strip the piece you like and then refinish with an oil based enamel if brushing. If you don't want to brush the piece, you might consider using spray cans. One trick I use when using spray cans is to heat the can in water from your hot water tap. Heat builds up the pressure in the can and makes them spray better. Also, all oil paints (which is what probably is in the can) become more viscous and flow better when heated. Spray using linear strokes overlapping about 50% so as to keep a flowing wet edge.
    Couldn't agree more.

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