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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
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    11

    Default Plaster/wallpapered walls...how to paint?

    I had posted earlier about how to paint on walls that had painted-over wallpaper on them. We now have (maybe) a more complex issue:

    Some of the wallpaper had bubbled up, so I began to tear it off. Some sections of the walls are now bare plaster; other sections are a mixture of plaster/painted wallpaper, yet other sections are all painted wallpaper with no bubbling.

    So where do we go from here? The local hardware store suggested coating all the walls with "mud" aka topping joint compound, sanding, priming and painting.

    Does anyone see any issues with this process?

    Thanks,
    Emily&Andy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    5,844

    Default Re: Plaster/wallpapered walls...how to paint?

    One of the issues with that is that the applied mud may end up loosening the wallpaper not the mention it's a lot of work to get a smooth finish. I would suggest you rent a steamer form the local tool rental and do the job right by removing all the wall paper.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Plaster/wallpapered walls...how to paint?

    Thanks, Jack.

    The only problem is that there is only wallpaper on some of the wall. The genius who painted this room back in the day ripped off some of the wallpaper, but not all of it. So, we are getting off the wallpaper that is still there, but then are left with patches that are just paint, and patches that are plaster.

    Thanks, and let me know what you think about our lovely situation!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    Default Re: Plaster/wallpapered walls...how to paint?

    It's always fun to follow up someone who had gone the job half a##. Its sounds like skim coating may be you best option. With paster walls it is possible to use stripper to remove paint if it needs to be done. I would still try to get all the wallpaper off before skim coating other wise the liquid in the skim coat may soak into the wallpaper and you'll have the wallpaper and the skim coat laying on the floor.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Plaster/wallpapered walls...how to paint?

    Hmmm...it seems that the paper wasn't wallpaper after all, but something applied to protect the cracks in the plaster?

    Does this still mean skim coating? If so, do I use the "mud" Menards sold me?

    My father in law said to sand whatever is left on the walls, prime and paint. I really don't want to screw this up!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,844

    Default Re: Plaster/wallpapered walls...how to paint?

    It sounds like you are talking about paper drywall tape. It will get air bubbles under it if not applied properly. The easiest thing to do is cut the bubbles out with an Exacto knife or utility knife, then skim-coat. You can use regular premixed drywall mud and apply your first coat about 1/16" thick. I think one of the main things for a beginner to remember is don't over work it. An easy way to get started is to do about a 3' by 3' section, apply the mud and smooth. Don't worry about getting it perfect. Once that section is done do another section with about 3 or 4 inches of untouched area between the new section and the first. That way your not troweling onto partially set mug. If you leave trowel lines, once it dries dampen the lines with a sponge and scrap them off with you drywall knife, and fill any voids. Once the sections are dry it is easy to fill in the areas between. It takes time and patience and you need to allow the mud to dry well before going over it again. That would be at least 1 day but I prefer 2 days.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

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