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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default Yard drainage issues

    All,

    Every time I get a really good rain, I get standing water in my back yard. It sometimes boarders on becoming a lake. I've seen suggestions about digging a trench and drain, but the problem is the yard slopes away from the house and the house is lower than the surrounding houses. I'm more or less in a pit. How can I get the water out to the street when I have to go uphill to make it work? Any ideas are welcome.

    Thanks,
    Rob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    443

    Default Re: Yard drainage issues

    Rob:

    Standing water problems can almost always be solved by digging a trench at a low point in your yard, installing a drywell, & directing the storm water to the drywell via 4" plastic drain pipe.

    This is a GRAVITY system, since water always flows downhill, from a higher point to a lower point.

    In some rare cases, the yard doesn't drain properly because of too much clay in the soil, etc., & additional work has to be done to make the yard soil more porous.

    Try to do a "perc" test of different parts of your yard to see if you can determine which area has the best drainage; dig small one foot diameter holes 1' deep & fill with water & time how quickly they drain; repeat filling them several times.

    The best & least troublesome system is one where the water flows by gravity.

    It's possible to install a sump pump in rare cases to pump the water onto the street, but this is usually not allowed by city ordinances.

    Google the phrase "soggy yard" to get sites that explain how to install drywells, & consult the sites below.

    To look at these sites, one would think that it's beyond a diy project, but it's not; the job takes only simple tools & the supplies are inexpensive & widely avaialble at the big box stores.

    One of the sites quotes a price for drywells, but there's no need to buy a drywell kit, the drywell hole can be filled with old bricks, rocks, broken masonry, etc., (no wood allowed), a steel drum with holes punched in it,; even a heavy duty inverted plastic trash barrel punched with holes (or 2 of them ganged together) is fine.

    http://www.rd.com/familyhandyman/content/18297/
    http://hometown.aol.com/eilatlog/pip...pipeworks.html
    http://www.thenaturalhome.com/drywellinstallation.htm
    Last edited by JacktheShack; 08-20-2007 at 10:44 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Yard drainage issues

    Jack,

    Thanks for the links. My problem is aggravated by having a very high water table.

    Rob


    Quote Originally Posted by JacktheShack View Post
    Rob:

    Standing water problems can almost always be solved by digging a trench at a low point in your yard, installing a drywell, & directing the storm water to the drywell via 4" plastic drain pipe.

    This is a GRAVITY system, since water always flows downhill, from a higher point to a lower point.

    In some rare cases, the yard doesn't drain properly because of too much clay in the soil, etc., & additional work has to be done to make the yard soil more porous.

    Try to do a "perc" test of different parts of your yard to see if you can determine which area has the best drainage; dig small one foot diameter holes 1' deep & fill with water & time how quickly they drain; repeat filling them several times.

    The best & least troublesome system is one where the water flows by gravity.

    It's possible to install a sump pump in rare cases to pump the water onto the street, but this is usually not allowed by city ordinances.

    Google the phrase "soggy yard" to get sites that explain how to install drywells, & consult the sites below.

    To look at these sites, one would think that it's beyond a diy project, but it's not; the job takes only simple tools & the supplies are inexpensive & widely avaialble at the big box stores.

    One of the sites quotes a price for drywells, but there's no need to buy a drywell kit, the drywell hole can be filled with old bricks, rocks, broken masonry, etc., (no wood allowed), a steel drum with holes punched in it,; even a heavy duty inverted plastic trash barrel punched with holes (or 2 of them ganged together) is fine.

    http://www.rd.com/familyhandyman/content/18297/
    http://hometown.aol.com/eilatlog/pip...pipeworks.html
    http://www.thenaturalhome.com/drywellinstallation.htm

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