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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    COSTA:

    IMHO: for a crawl space I would get a (very) small volume fan. Your total circulation is small since the ceiling may be low. Also put a screen (like 1/8")on the intake to keep out the critters.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    [QUOTE=njlou;253001]
    Quote Originally Posted by thenewguy View Post
    Well,I've got my system up and running finally. Been running for about 48 hours now. It's definitely working well as far as the air circulation goes, but is doing nothing for the humidity level in the basement........the humidity level outside at this point is 73%, and is about the same in the basement.QUOTE]

    hi
    Back again to check on my students. Lets see some pics.
    Yes you will be bringing in air that is the same humidity as the outside, but it is fresh air. In my system my air is drawn in through the normal gaps in my metal basement hatch. It faces south and absorbs some heat, so the air is a little warmer.

    This summer has been miserable.I got (some) water in the basement for the first time since the ground is totally saturated. It just never stops raining.(for 2 months) We had half a years rain in a few weeks.

    If I didnt have the fan, the smell would have been intolerable!
    Now after all the rain, and water in the basement the air quality is not perfect, but 10000x better than it would be without it.

    Answer, I would not change a thing.
    I dont think I would drill a hole in the ceiling/floor.
    Pic's and commentary coming soon, the system won't let me upload pictures because I have less than 10 "posts"

    I'll be back shortly.......

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    [QUOTE=njlou;253001]
    Quote Originally Posted by thenewguy View Post
    Well,I've got my system up and running finally. Been running for about 48 hours now. It's definitely working well as far as the air circulation goes, but is doing nothing for the humidity level in the basement........the humidity level outside at this point is 73%, and is about the same in the basement.QUOTE]

    hi
    Back again to check on my students. Lets see some pics.

    Yes you will be bringing in air that is the same humidity as the outside, but it is fresh air. In my system my air is drawn in through the normal gaps in my metal basement hatch. It faces south and absorbs some heat, so the air is a little warmer.

    This summer has been miserable.I got (some) water in the basement for the first time since the ground is totally saturated. It just never stops raining.(for 2 months) We had half a years rain in a few weeks.
    If I didnt have the fan, the smell would have been intolerable!
    Now after all the rain, and water in the basement the air quality is not perfect, but 10000x better than it would be without it.

    Answer, I would not change a thing.
    I dont think I would drill a hole in the ceiling/floor.
    Same problem here in NW Pennsylvania, the ground is still saturated from all the rain and now melting snow......

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Quote Originally Posted by njlou View Post
    In your case you MAY get some smell returning to the open window.
    Mine is below an unused window but there is a faint musty smell from the discharge.

    You can always just run a pipe outside to where ever you want away from the window. just keep the opening facing down to prevent water from entering and put a coarse screen to keep out bugs etc.

    There is minimal noise but it is a fan!

    good luck and post some pictures.
    LOU
    Thanks, pictures coming soon..........

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Sorry for all the repetitive posts, but I had to get up to the magic number before I could post pic's......

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Okay,here are some pics of my system. I installed it in what I consider to be the dampest part of the basement. When we bought this house in 2001, this was a partioned off "junk" room with paneling covering the walls. One day I noticed water seeping out from under the paneling. Proceeded to remove the paneling and discovered the mess that the previous owners tried to hide.......
    I'm still debating whether I should continue to run this through the winter months or not.
    If I do, where is the "fresh' air going to come from with all the doors and windows closed?
    The pic's of where the wall meets the floor show a gap where a "professional" basement guy installed a drainage system that is supposed to drain water from the walls into one of my sumps.
    Unfortunately, this created another problem. A continuing battle with mold growing on the walls directly above the gap between walls and floor. I'm seriously considering sealing the gap and possibly installing one of the baseboard type drainage systems right over the top of this.
    If anyone has a better idea, I'm open to any and all suggestions.













  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    nice job!!!

    Where does it vent??
    It looks like it goes outside above the window. I used my window as modified for the exhaust. see the pics.

    I would not seal the drain gap. It was designed to handle water from the walls?? You might need it some day during a storm.

    What you could do is get some bleach in a spray bottle and douse the perimeter then rinse allowing the pump to remove it. Be careful where it drains. Use a lot of ventilation during the process to protect yourself and expect your clothes to turn white. LOL

    BTW: Bleach does not leave a residue when it gets old (like fast)or exposed to light. It will just smell fresh!!!

    Also I used a piece of "underdrain pipe"(with the holes)at the base along the floor. It seems to quiet the wacka wacka noise.
    It actually cuts turbulance. Aim it towards to furthest corner to increase overall efficiency, since you want the lowest/furthest point from your intake source.

    Leaving it on in the winter is recommended by the "original" company. I agree I dont want to heat that air.

    You could compromise and put a timer on it to run in the day for a couple of hours.

    Good luck.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    I live in Tallahassee Florida and have recently discovered some mold issues on my windows as well as a moldy smell in one of the rooms. The house is a 1942 brick bungalow, 1400 SF. I was interested in constructing one of the radon fan ventilation systems and have a couple of questions for anyone on this blog who has installed one. First, the only place I can install one is in my attic, the crawl space is not airtight at all and i am afraid the system will suck to much air from all of the venting openings in the crawl space, so i was considering installing it in the attic as the illustrations for the radon fan manufacturer show. Will this still work, and will it improve its operation if i was to install an air intake into the system in each of the rooms? I have a fire place, which, i am sure has some leaks where the new air can enter as well as some of the old windows, or would an additional air intake vent help? Second, does this system really control humidity? It seems like it would bring in same humid air from the outside as is inside, or is the simple movement of air dries things out as well as keeps the mold spores from settling down to grow? I would appreciate any help I can get. Thank you,

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    AFAIK: Tallahassee Florida has a lot of humidity. your house is even further affected by how/where it sits relative to sunlight/trees etc.

    That said, the fan system we see here works by using airflow - hopefully dry air. BUT what you may consider humid, may be less than the room you want to dry out.

    Our problem is basement ventilation. Basements rarely get adequate air/light, so they are damp/moldy.

    your issue seems to be total house ventilation.

    Only you (and I suggest a friends help) can determine the best air flow for your house.You also want the intake from a relatively warm/dry side of the house.

    Many homeowners use a whole house (attic) fan which may work. And you may want to consider a fan timer to work in the daytime when the air is dry(er).

    NOTE: you may have other issues such as clinging vines or poor roof drainage etc.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Just wanted to update you all that my homemade bucket-and-fan ventilator system (see my earlier post) worked to my satisfaction last summer -- which was our wettest in many years. The fan kept the air moving in my basement and there was noticeably less musty smell. I did not test the humidity with a humidistat but that seemed better too, although with all the rain I did have actual water seepage which eventually dried itself out -- presumably with the help of the ventilator unit. Note that I have a 125 year old basement with stone walls that is basically for storage and a workshop -- I can't comment for those of you who have finished basements with living space but I think it would help. Someone asked for pictures, I am not that technically savvy but I think everyone can imagine an upside down bucket with a fan on top and a dryer vent hose attached.

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