+ Reply to Thread
Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 95
  1. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Great work!!
    The secret is to move tons of air!!!

    As you found out the radon fan is much cheaper than the commercial systems. AND the fan is quite durable!!

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    I plan on installing this system soon. I just bought my fan from homeoasis at about a $15.00 savings over RC williams. The biggest savings came from the couplings. They are only $4.83 vs $15.25. In addition, they offer free shipping. I was forced to buy the exhaust cap from RE williams, paying $6.00 shipping.

  3. #73
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    I built a similar system about 2 yrs .ago per an article from a past issue of Fine Homebuilding Magazine. It uses some 6" duct and a plywood housing for an axial fan. The fan I purchased was a Dayton3vu69. It's rated at 239 cfm and .23amps.I've had it running continuosly and it seemed to be fine. I am wondering if the motor is ok for this application as one of the plans called for a fan rated to run 24/7. What is this rating? Is there a safety problem? as my present fan seemed to be fine and not running hot.
    I am doing some remodeling in the basement and want to ensure that my dayton fan is acceptable in lieu of the radon fan that is suggested before I cut holes in the house as the new location would require a "non-window" location.

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1

    Cool Re: wave ventilation

    I heard their radio commercial and decided to check out their website. There is nothing on the website that explains how this unit works and there are no prices.
    What there was, on the last page of the brochure, is a logo for something called "HVI", the Home Ventilation Institute.
    I went to their webite and could find NO listing for WAVE in any of their lists, including their master list!
    Maybe I missed it, or maybe not...

    They are about 20 minutes from our home, so I may stop in to their showroom (if they have one!) and will report back, if I meet with success.

    Dave

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Looks like nothing more than a glorified exhaust fan. creativeaccessory.net
    I'm new here, there are many don't know place needs friends to help, please care me!
    My home page:creativeaccessory.net

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    I'm interested in putting a speed control switch on my system. The enclosed literature with the Fantech unit says that it must be "solid state". Anyone have any experience with this?
    Thanks!

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Nijou:

    Just curious: why didn't you add a humidistat to your rig? Is the cost of the 24/7 fan so low that it hardly matters?

    C

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Could someone spell out in more detail the threat mentioned by canuk of placing njlou's ventilation system near combustion devices like water heaters, boilers or furnaces.

    I would like to erect one of these systems in my basement, in the same area as an oil-burning furnace (47 years old, 80 percent efficient) and a gas-fired hot water heater. The furnace would be just over 7 feet away, and the hot water heater about 11 feet.

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    York, PA
    Posts
    1

    Post Re: wave ventilation

    Quote Originally Posted by Barmixer View Post
    I plan on installing this system soon. I just bought my fan from homeoasis at about a $15.00 savings over RC williams. The biggest savings came from the couplings. They are only $4.83 vs $15.25. In addition, they offer free shipping. I was forced to buy the exhaust cap from RE williams, paying $6.00 shipping.
    I just signed up on TOH and am very interested in getting some model numbers and names for the fan and other parts needed to assemble the basement vent system. I have read most of the messages, but I'm still having some issues trying to gather the specifics on the required parts. I sure would appreciate someone would email me a list. By looking at all the post dates, there is alot of experience on the system being functional and the expertiese on the building and installing said system and I would like to tap into it to reduce my chance of messing up.

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: wave ventilation

    Hi

    I am back. I cant believe it's been installed for 4 years. So long ago that my pictures are not installed anymore. I have an unfinished basement, an oil burner and a (metal hatch)entry in addition to the interior stairs.

    I used a Fantech HP2190 fan. The unit is simply installed on the wall with (2) "L" brackets and hose clamps. Then I used 4"PVC pipe and couplings - see picture. Then out the modified window. The metal bars are security.
    The intake tube is ON the ground. That is where it differs from a radon installation.
    BTW use PVC pipe with holes in it on the floor horizontal section to act as a silencer.

    The (intake air) hatch is designed with some large spaces that are overlapped by the cover and provide great ventilation. I use this to establish my flow pattern.
    The fan is on the far side of the hatch and the oil burner is on a far adjacent side of the room. So in effect the oilburner is about 30 ft away from the hatch and the fan - think of a triangle - hatch-oilburner-fan.

    Here is a little more than I know.

    All installations are different based on the room and the flow pattern. You have to judge the open area that lets air through.
    You also want a long distance to let the air flow through.

    I did not use a humidistat since I thought is was like emptying the ocean. When could it ever shut off??
    BTW I shut down the fan in the winter. The humidity is low and the oil burner provides more airflow/heat. Yes I use the oilburner for hot water in the summer.

    Yes it is a glorified exhaust fan. The radon fan is rated for 24/7 @20 years. Since I use it only in summer it should last forever. Humidifiers are trash units, cost a ton to buy/run and need to be emptied. AND the air never gets dry since the units are always undersized AND the air is still stinky!!!

    Good luck

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •