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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8

    Default Painting steel entry door with oil based paint

    Please offer advice or tips....
    I was told that painting a brand new steel entry door with oil base paint was the best way to go for durability. So I bought a decent Sherwin Williams brand of oil based gloss enamel along with a Purdy brush meant for oil based paint.

    I have never used oil based paint before, so I was very surprised on how it spread. It seems very thick, and doesn't flow well. I have now put on two coats, and it looks like crap. Lots of brush marks, plus ugly drag marks from an area done earlier to one done later.

    I followed the basic instructions I found on the internet on the proper method to paint a paneled door, but this just isn't working! What am I doing wrong? Do I need to thin the paint?

    I have done this in the early morning before it get extremely hot, and have been working as fast as I can so that the paint doesn't dry out while I am trying to cut in between one area and another, but this just doesn't seem to work right.

    I am thinking about sanding down the entire side of the door that I have done so far and changing to latex.

    Please help if you have experience with this!
    Thanks so much!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,827

    Default Re: Painting steel entry door with oil based paint

    It sounds like you are trying to put it on to thick. When you paint you should just dip the very tips of th bristles in the paint and work it into the surface of whatever you are painting. If the brush looks like the paint is half way up the bristles after a couple of minutes you are loading to much paint. You get much better results with 2 thin coats than with one thick coat. By the way you can get the same results with latex if you slather it on.
    Jack
    Last edited by JLMCDANIEL; 07-28-2008 at 10:22 PM.
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Painting steel entry door with oil based paint

    Thanks for the advice.

    So, if I apply this paint a bit thinner, won't it dry out faster and cause more problems in cutting in when I get to the final areas that need paint?

    And if I need to apply it thinner, do I dip the brush into the paint can way more often so that I get better coverage? Or just do more coats?

    Should I be adding some type of extender to make the paint more flexible longer? I saw that tip someplace, but didn't see that stuff available in my smallish town.

    And since I have this gloppy looking mess on the door right now, can I salvage it, or should I sand it and start over?

    Thanks again,
    One frustrated novice oil painter!!!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,827

    Default Re: Painting steel entry door with oil based paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoda53 View Post
    Thanks for the advice.

    So, if I apply this paint a bit thinner, won't it dry out faster and cause more problems in cutting in when I get to the final areas that need paint?
    No, find a shady spot to paint not in the sun, oil based paint generally takes from 12 to 24 hours to dry but the surface can be dried much faster and baking in the sun can cause this. It usually takes me less than 15 minutes to paint a door.Be sure to let it set at least over night before recoating.
    And if I need to apply it thinner, do I dip the brush into the paint can way more often so that I get better coverage? Or just do more coats?
    Yes, but you try to spread the paint as thin as possible.
    Should I be adding some type of extender to make the paint more flexible longer? I saw that tip someplace, but didn't see that stuff available in my smallish town.
    I have never used an extender.
    And since I have this gloppy looking mess on the door right now, can I salvage it, or should I sand it and start over?
    You can sand it with 220 grit sand paper to remove the marks and make a smooth surface, but you don't need to sand all the paint off.
    Thanks again,
    One frustrated novice oil painter!!!!!
    I hope that helps.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

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