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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default extension cord plug

    My DH cut off the end of our orange extension cord with the electric pruners. I have a replacement plug and would like to attach it to the cord. I know that the black wire goes on the ground terminal, but which terminal takes the green wire and which takes the white wire?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
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    5,796

    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Quote Originally Posted by woodwoman View Post
    My DH cut off the end of our orange extension cord with the electric pruners. I have a replacement plug and would like to attach it to the cord. I know that the black wire goes on the ground terminal, but which terminal takes the green wire and which takes the white wire?
    NO,No,No


    The green wire (ground) goes on the green screw (ground), the black wire (hot) goes on the brass screw, and the white wire (common) goes on the silver screw.

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
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    Jul 2008
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Ahhhh! Looking at this replacement plug in very bright sunlight, I can see a slightly green tint on one of the screws. Thanks all!

  4. #4
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    Jun 2007
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    Shamokin, Pa.
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    645

    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Good to hear you have rectified your situation. Stay safe.
    Hijacking this post, is it not an OSHA violation to use a cord with a repaired end? Not that it is a problem a homeowner would face. Well not yet, anyway......

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Quote Originally Posted by Ernie_Fergler View Post
    Good to hear you have rectified your situation. Stay safe.
    Hijacking this post, is it not an OSHA violation to use a cord with a repaired end? Not that it is a problem a homeowner would face. Well not yet, anyway......
    on the commercial jobs you can have a replacement end as long as done correctly. under no circumstances can you use any electrical tape on your cord. (trust me they will cut your cord in half at the tape) no cuts at all in the casing are permitted, must be taken off the job site.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Shamokin, Pa.
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    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Quote Originally Posted by havanagranite View Post
    on the commercial jobs you can have a replacement end as long as done correctly. under no circumstances can you use any electrical tape on your cord. (trust me they will cut your cord in half at the tape) no cuts at all in the casing are permitted, must be taken off the job site.
    I have witnessed them cutting cords as well. I always wanted to plug them quickly back in before the cut....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    The deep South
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    459

    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Quote Originally Posted by havanagranite View Post
    on the commercial jobs you can have a replacement end as long as done correctly. under no circumstances can you use any electrical tape on your cord. (trust me they will cut your cord in half at the tape) no cuts at all in the casing are permitted, must be taken off the job site.
    Do you have a link to the " no tape " rule ?
    Some of the safety nazi's at work require us to use colored tape
    as an inspection mark .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Quote Originally Posted by djohns View Post
    Do you have a link to the " no tape " rule ?
    Some of the safety nazi's at work require us to use colored tape
    as an inspection mark .
    I can look all I know is we had some of our cords cut that had electrical tape on them and that was their given reason. but I will check

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    980

    Default Re: extension cord plug

    this is what I found (here they are talking about superficial knicks that don't cut all the way through the insulation.)


    Recommendation against taping

    While taping these incidental abrasions and cuts does not necessarily violate any OSHA standard, we recommend that employers not tape this type of damage for two reasons. First, Section 1926.403(a) requires that "all electrical conductors and equipment shall be approved." This standard precludes the use of approved electrical conductors and equipment if their characteristics are significantly altered. Applying electrical tape that is too thick or applying too much of it could change the cord's original flexibility and lead to internal damage. Second, the depth of the abrasions and cuts cannot be monitored to see if they get worse without removing the tape.

    It should also be kept in mind that the heavy-duty extension cords commonly used on construction sites are designed to withstand a hostile environment. Damage to an extension cord that is bad enough to consider taping may have caused damage beyond the jacket.

    Tape may not be used to repair significant damage to cord jackets

    Repair or replacement of a flexible cord (depending on its gauge) is required when the outer jacket is deeply penetrated (enough to cause that part of the cord to bend more than the undamaged part) or penetrated completely, or when the conductors or their insulation inside are damaged. Two provisions of the standard prohibit the repair of the jacket of a worn or frayed flexible cord with electrical tape. Section 1926.403(a) requires that the cord be approved. The original approval of the cord was based on the types of materials and construction used. As noted above, taping the cord can change the flexibility characteristics of the cord, which in turn can affect the amount of stress in the adjacent areas. This is of particular concern with respect to the grounding wire. Also, the jacket is designed both to prevent damage to the conductors and insulators inside and to further insulate the conductors. Taped repairs usually will not duplicate the cord's original characteristics; in most cases neither the jacket's strength nor flexibility characteristics will be restored. Therefore, tape repairs of the jacket may not be used to bring a worn or frayed flexible cord into compliance.


    while they say that as long as it is superficial once the inspector cuts it, how can you prove that it was only superficial. but you do notice that they don't recommend the use of electrical tape on cords. all I know for sure is we lost probally 3 or 4 cords from that one inspector. have you ever tried to challenge one when they do something? I wouldn't suggest doing so, for no one is 100% compliant in every aspect they can find something wrong and if you want to challenge them on an issue involving a cord they can go much higher. they didn't write us up for the cords but they did cut them in half and told us to remove them from the job. we considered ourselves lucky that, that was the only thing involving us that they picked on. we used a lot of powder actuated fasteners, and I'm sure you know that is usually one of their pets.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Shamokin, Pa.
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    Default Re: extension cord plug

    Quote Originally Posted by havanagranite View Post
    I can look all I know is we had some of our cords cut that had electrical tape on them and that was their given reason. but I will check
    I tape my cords a certain way [just for identification purposes only], but have had to explain that.
    Has not been a "major" problem yet...

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