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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    5

    Question Rusty nail heads - exterior

    I'm in the process of paint the exterior of my 1950 ranch home. It's been approx 8 to 10 years since I last painted. Besides the normal scrapping & sanding, I now have to deal w/ nail heads that are rusty and are appearing all over the house. My siding is 8" lap Cedar siding. Does anyone have a solution or recommendation on the best approach to fixing this problem?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Rusty nail heads - exterior

    marko,

    Have dealt with this on numerous occasions. If you can't or don't intend to remove those rusty nails and replace them with either hot-dip galvys or maybe even SS....then I think you'll find that aluminum paint will work well.

    An aerosol can is handy for this. Apply three coats over every nailhead. It dries pretty fast so you can usually just chase yourself around the house. When final coat is dry, prime as per normal...then the topcoats.

    Should last for the duration of the new paint job.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Rusty nail heads - exterior

    Thanks ****hiller.

    So, your saying that using aluminum paint (spray) is the only thing I need to do - no sanding?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Rusty nail heads - exterior

    When you lay down a few coats of aluminum paint you're basically applying a thin layer of aluminum over the iron-oxide/rust because aluminum paint is comprised of very finely ground aluminum powder and a binder. End result is very much like a thin layer of aluminum foil. (More coats is better, but 3 should suppress your rust stains for at least 10 years, maybe more. Depends on climate, etc.) AP makes a great sealer for various types of hard-to-suppress leeching stains (such as those that can't be suppressed long-term by conventional stain-sealers like Kilz)......for both interior and exterior applications.

    Sanding would be a plus for sure, but isn't absolutely necessary, IME (in my experience).

    Seems that most aluminum paint these days is glossy-sheen by nature/formulation..... and consequently the recommendation of a coat or two of primer over that...... just to ensure good adhesion of the final topcoats. If you can find it in a non-glossy/flat formula, so much the better. That can be hard to find though. (Aerosol "high-heat" paints in a flat-sheen are sometimes available thru automotive supply stores)

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