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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default back flow flap valve

    My drains backed up in the basement of my 1941 house, after a big rain. The plumber said my problem was due to a back flow flap valve that was bad. He wants to break up my floor and replace the iron pipe with PVC. Does this sound correct?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: back flow flap valve

    ondraa .... unless a back flow valve had been installed to your drain in the recent past it's unlikely there is one based on the vintage of your home.

    If one does exist and is faulty and depending on type and location .... it might be a simple replacement or repair.
    The simple ball type ( check valve) usually can be found in the floor drain and for the most part is relatively easy to replace.

    If it is the flap type back flow valve located on the main drain line of the home .... there is usually an inspection cover than can be removed .... there might just be some debris obstructing the flap to close. If this type is faulty then the floor will have to be broken open in order to detach it from the drain line and reinstall a new one.

    Other than that I'm not sure why the plumber is recommending replacing the cast iron pipe with PVC .... unless they had run a scope through the pipe and found a break.

    There was a previous discussion on back flow valves that you may find useful in this link:

    http://advice.thisoldhouse.com/showt...ack+flow+valve


    Hope this helps.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: back flow flap valve

    Your drain should have nothing to do with the rainfall and the groundwater. Your floor drain should be part of your sewer system which allows the sewer water to go to the treatment plant. Now if the drain pipes are cast iron or galvanized piping they might be rusted through and then allowing the groundwater (from the rainfall) to soak up into the drain line and then enter your home.
    Process of elimination. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: back flow flap valve

    Your drain should have nothing to do with the rainfall and the groundwater. Your floor drain should be part of your sewer system which allows the sewer water to go to the treatment plant.
    If the foundation perimeter drains empty into the house main line .... will be affected by heavy rainfall.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Memphis, not Egypt
    Posts
    183

    Default Re: back flow flap valve

    Your house is old and messed up. Who Knows? Spend a whole bunch of money or move.

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