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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dover, De
    Posts
    2

    Default Central Air in 1901 Victorian

    I just bought an old Victorian house with a boiler system for heating. I'd like to replace the system with a gas furnace/central air. I'd like to damage the plaster as little as possible. I'm thinking maybe a dual zone system is the way to go. I was thinking I could run the ductwork for the upstairs in the attic and the ductwork for the mainfloor in the partial basement/crawlspace. What are your thoughts? Also, what are your thoughts on replacing the old windows vs. weatherstripping/refurbishing? They are in pretty good working order, I'm just wondering what would improve resale the most.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    5,558

    Default Re: Central Air in 1901 Victorian

    Quote Originally Posted by stewie View Post
    I just bought an old Victorian house with a boiler system for heating. I'd like to replace the system with a gas furnace/central air. I'd like to damage the plaster as little as possible. I'm thinking maybe a dual zone system is the way to go. I was thinking I could run the ductwork for the upstairs in the attic and the ductwork for the mainfloor in the partial basement/crawlspace. What are your thoughts? Also, what are your thoughts on replacing the old windows vs. weatherstripping/refurbishing? They are in pretty good working order, I'm just wondering what would improve resale the most.
    The two system set up is quite doable though expensive and would minimize tear-up. You may be able to have the old windows reworked, that is have double paned glass installed or you could have historically accurate storm windows installed. Maintaining historical features is almost always a good investment.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    42

    Default Re: Central Air in 1901 Victorian

    Having performed a lot of HVAC renvoation in older turn-of-the-century homes, a constant concern is providing a system that provides the best possible efficiency and effectiveness, while having as little impact on the architectural integrity of the home. This presents a challenge to say the least. No one wants to have to "box in" ductwork or create unsightly soffits that may detract from the appearance. At the same time, I have to be sure to provide a system that meets everyone's expectations; both mine and the homeowners.

    It sounds like an ideal arrangement to take care of the second floor from overhead and the first floor from underneath. What you will probably find is that the second floor system will appear to be disproportionate for cooling that for heating. This is simply because some of the cold air will gravitate downward toward the first floor and also help off set the cooling load for the first floor. Conversely the first floor heating system will help to keep the second floor warm thereby decreasing the heating load on the second floor space.

    Both system should be independently sized so that (and this is important) each system is not dependent on the other system running in order to work properly.

    A professional HVAC contractor can come in and perform a load calc for each space, i.e. first floor, and second floor, and with that information make a proposal accordingly.

    You may in fact want to consider a heat pump for the second floor since you will not be as dependent on this system for heating and use high-efficiency gas for the first floor. You can even consider a 'dual-fuel' application for both systems that will give you the 'best of both worlds.'

    I just wish I was there and had a chance to look at this and give you my thoughts.

    Hope the above info helps.

    All the best, Irishmist
    Live your life as an EXCLAMATION; not an explanation!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Dover, De
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Central Air in 1901 Victorian

    Thank you both for the help. I think the indep. systems will work well. It probably won't happen until next summer, but I'll try to post the results! Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Central Air in 1901 Victorian

    Quote Originally Posted by Irishmist View Post
    Having performed a lot of HVAC renvoation in older turn-of-the-century homes, a constant concern is providing a system that provides the best possible efficiency and effectiveness, while having as little impact on the architectural integrity of the home. This presents a challenge to say the least. No one wants to have to "box in" ductwork or create unsightly soffits that may detract from the appearance. At the same time, I have to be sure to provide a system that meets everyone's expectations; both mine and the homeowners.

    It sounds like an ideal arrangement to take care of the second floor from overhead and the first floor from underneath. What you will probably find is that the second floor system will appear to be disproportionate for cooling that for heating. This is simply because some of the cold air will gravitate downward toward the first floor and also help off set the cooling load for the first floor. Conversely the first floor heating system will help to keep the second floor warm thereby decreasing the heating load on the second floor space.

    Both system should be independently sized so that (and this is important) each system is not dependent on the other system running in order to work properly.

    A professional HVAC contractor can come in and perform a load calc for each space, i.e. first floor, and second floor, and with that information make a proposal accordingly.

    You may in fact want to consider a heat pump for the second floor since you will not be as dependent on this system for heating and use high-efficiency gas for the first floor. You can even consider a 'dual-fuel' application for both systems that will give you the 'best of both worlds.'

    I just wish I was there and had a chance to look at this and give you my thoughts.

    Hope the above info helps.

    All the best, Irishmist
    Irish....YOU ROCK! You wouldnt be interested in comming to work for me in Texas, would ya?

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