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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Mount Laurel, New Jersey
    Posts
    9

    Question Replacement windows

    A question that has probably been asked before.
    I am in the market for replacement widows. I check the popular brands, Pella, Anderson (big$$) on the net and they look good, but then I find reviews from people who have installed them and find they are not cut out to what they are supposed to be.
    Question:
    What replacement widows (double hung) would you recomend??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Replacement windows

    Are you looking at new construction type windows or insert type that will be installed into the existing frame of the old window?

    We replaced the existing windows with Andersen's (double hung Narrowline model) about 14 years ago and have been very happy with them. So much so that we went with the same type about 5 years ago on an addition. Both times we used new construction windows, not replacement inserts.

    I have read many disappointing reviews of the Pella's, general feeling was that quality didn't match the high price.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lakeland ,MN
    Posts
    356

    Default Re: Replacement windows

    Alot of people have problems because of the installtion of the windows not the window itself. I would make sure you have good contractor that has refrences and is licsensed.
    Harry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Mount Laurel, New Jersey
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Replacement windows

    Quote Originally Posted by bp21901 View Post
    Are you looking at new construction type windows or insert type that will be installed into the existing frame of the old window?

    We replaced the existing windows with Andersen's (double hung Narrowline model) about 14 years ago and have been very happy with them. So much so that we went with the same type about 5 years ago on an addition. Both times we used new construction windows, not replacement inserts.

    I have read many disappointing reviews of the Pella's, general feeling was that quality didn't match the high price.
    Will be installing into existing frame.

    You say you went with 'new construction windows' for your project. Won't that call for much more construction translating to much more cost?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Holliston, MA
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: Replacement windows

    My wife and I just went through the same situation. Extremely painful on what to believe and who to believe.

    Basically, we are down to looking at two different window brands, Alside vs Anderson. I don't recall the exact model Alside but Anderson we are leaning towards is the Woodright line. We are waiting on the estimate on Anderson. Another point of reference is Consumer Reports, I think they just reviewed replacement windows. Might want to check that out also.

    Bottom line, we will have windows replaced in the next month or so.

    Hopefully this helps a little.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    near St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    166

    Default Re: Replacement windows

    Since you are installing into existing frames you will be buying window inserts. Inserts cost more but are faster and easier to install so the installation costs are lower than for new construction windows.

    Hereís what Consumer Reports recommends in their quick picks:
    Anderson 400-series Tilt-Wash (Woodwright)
    Pella Proline
    Anderson 200-series Tilt-Wash
    Pella Impervia

    Of the above windows only the Anderson 400-series is clad wood that is available in custom sizes. Hereís a link:
    http://www.andersenwindows.com/servl...Window&tab=1-1


    I did a presentation on windows for my Home Improvement Club at work. Below is the summary of the things you should look for in a window.
     Double-glazed (minimum).
     Low-e coating.
     Energy star label.
     Tilt in sash for easy cleaning.
     Sash made with solid wood (clad or not) or plastic composite.
     Avoid large all-vinyl windows.
     Stainless steel spacers with a thermal break.
     Glass should meet standards of sealed glass association.
     Buy from a nationally known company.
     Get a good, transferable warranty.

    The window is only part of the equation. They must be properly installed. Even if you are not installing them yourself you should know what constitutes a good installation. Tom Silva installed Anderson window inserts in last seasonís Newton house. Check out the following installation information:
    http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-...171587,00.html

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Manitowoc Wi.
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Replacement windows

    I tend to agree about it maybe being the contractor. Ive heard estimates of up to $2000 per "opening" which I find outrageous.

    We recently replaced 13 28x62 and 28x66 windows in an old Victorian Shingle Style including a 48" wide cottage window for a total materials cost of just over $3,700. We went with Jeld Wen sash replacement kits which look original and took little effort to install. They could seal up a little better on the bottom since the original sills stay in place but I think a little extra weather stripping will solve that.

    In the past I have also used a nearly identical unit from Crestline. They have a newer sash unit design that I think is better but what I didnt like on the last batch was that the upper stop replacement piece was too narrow to fit in the original groove and they informed me that the no longer make the plastic version that used to tap in so nicely! So the new wooden ones are sitting there un-installed until someone can tell me how you can get them to stay in the old groove as thin as they are! Jeld Wen has a wooden one too but it is the right width and fits. Maybe they sent me the wrong thing and I just cant convince them of it?

    If I had it to do over again I would look more seriously at "pocket" windows which are a totally self contained unit that goes into the original frame as one piece. I think that might well be a tighter and even lower labor way to go. But they are somewhat more expensive too.


    Right now I am battling with the cottage window. It just didnt work out. But I will start a new thread on that!

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