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  1. #1

    Post Backwards sliding patio doors...

    From the TOH ****** Editors Inbox, johnpegker asks:

    "I have two sets of sliding patio doors. They are both in backwards (the sliding door is on the outside instead of the inside). How do I go about fixing this short of taking out the complete door (including frame), reversing and reinserting since the tracks for the sliding door are on the outside also?"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    UPSTATE NY
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors...

    John -

    That must have been a trend at one time - because I have the same thing in my kitchen. I believe it was done in the mid 60's and I've resigned myself to the fact that I will just have to replace them at some point in time and then they will be installed correctly.

    Debbie T

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Florida
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors...

    Quote Originally Posted by Administrator View Post
    From the TOH ****** Editors Inbox, johnpegker asks:

    "I have two sets of sliding patio doors. They are both in backwards (the sliding door is on the outside instead of the inside). How do I go about fixing this short of taking out the complete door (including frame), reversing and reinserting since the tracks for the sliding door are on the outside also?"
    Take a look at the frame, sliding door, and fixed pane carefully. See if the frame seems to be symmetrical inside/outside (many are). It may be possible to remove the sliding door, remove the fasteners in the fixed pane, move it to the outside track, fasten it back down (which may require drilling some new mounting holes), then place the sliding door on the inner track. You'll then have to see about moving the latch system to the inside track position.

    If this is possible for you, make sure to seal any holes left on the outside with caulk of some type.

    If this is not possible (the frame doesn't have the tracks for the sliding door on both "sides"), and you have to remove everything to reverse it, consider just buying a new door, as it may be less work in the long run to get everything right. Or at least find out if your local home store has the right size in stock, so that if you try to reverse it and break something, you can quickly get a new door.
    Tom Stangl
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    Caveat: IANAC (I Am Not A Contractor) - I am simply a DIYer that tends to do a lot of research. Contact licensed Contractors/Architects/whatever for the final legal word on any advice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors...

    If you try to reverse the door by moving the panels, you'll also have to address the weather stripping. It will be on the wrong side of each panel. This will also leave holes and/or slots that you'll have to repair, as the old locations for the weather stripping will now be on the inside and outside of the door, staring you in the face. If your door is over about 10 years old +/-, you may benefit from the energy savings of currently manufactured doors - low-e, argon filled, etc. All things considered, if it bugs you badly, a new door is probably the best answer. Best regards, Gary

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Florida
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors...

    Quote Originally Posted by guhl3 View Post
    If you try to reverse the door by moving the panels, you'll also have to address the weather stripping. It will be on the wrong side of each panel.
    Good point. Depending on how the weatherstripping is installed, and how you reverse the panels, it may not work. In that case, a newer door is definitely a good solution over reversing the entire frame/door system.
    Tom Stangl
    Hidden Content
    Prius Visual FAQ Home
    Hidden Content
    DSM Visual FAQ home

    Caveat: IANAC (I Am Not A Contractor) - I am simply a DIYer that tends to do a lot of research. Contact licensed Contractors/Architects/whatever for the final legal word on any advice.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors...

    Quote Originally Posted by Administrator View Post
    From the TOH ****** Editors Inbox, johnpegker asks:

    "I have two sets of sliding patio doors. They are both in backwards (the sliding door is on the outside instead of the inside). How do I go about fixing this short of taking out the complete door (including frame), reversing and reinserting since the tracks for the sliding door are on the outside also?"
    I worked for a distributor that handled PEACHTREE Doors & Windows. Their line of products were made that way on purpose. Cold or hot air would pust against the outside sliding panel, and in theory would stop there.
    Also then the screen could be hung on the inside track and would have a much great life because of that. {Baseballs, sun fade, etc].

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors...

    I have the same reversed doors. I need someone to figure out how to keep the door open just about a foot at night to allow a cross breeze in the house. If the doors were in the correct way I could put a bar on the inside at the bottom. Since they are reversed I can't. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Backwards sliding patio doors; security...

    As a manager/renter of older apartments, I've run into a simple solution to blocking access (partially or totally) with this type of door.
    At least two different manufacturers have sold a metal pin on a chain (that screw mounts on the inner frame) that can be inserted through a hole one drills through both frames to lock them together. One was placed at the top of the frame so children couldn't open it, but that might be a judgment call... They took care not to drill through the edge of the glass! One could select the amount of opening desired.
    I saw one with two holes about 6 inches apart, one to allow in a breeze or pet, the other totally closed. One of the pin locks had a little u-shaped bracket to hang the pin on also. They might be sold in the window and door security accessories section of home stores, near the sliding window track locks...
    Hope they're still currently available, I don't know.

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