+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    6

    Question repair or replace old windows with lead paint?

    We recently discovered that our home (built 1900) has lead paint on all the windows. Fortunately, we qualify for a state grant of $6500 to address the lead issues in the house. The lead removal contractor said that the cost of removing the lead and repairing the old wooden windows is about the same as buying new vinyl replacement windows, and is encouraging us to do the latter. Knowing nothing about replacement windows, my husband and I are unsure of what to do. Will they look terrible in our old home? How long will they last? In the long run, what will be a better buy for the money?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: repair or replace old windows with lead paint?

    We have the same dilemma. Replacement windows won't necessarily look bad, although some brands definitely will. In fact, they can look quite nice. They can be stained to match woodwork and you can get grills that match original. If you don't like vinyl, you can get wood interior on window.

    This is what we've found in our quest to solve problem of matching windows to old house:
    Marvins appear a pretty good match for older home.
    Pella seems to make some windows that would match older home, although I've heard mixed things about quality and customer service.
    Anderson makes a good window but, at least to my eye, the design isn't such a good match for an older home. Others may disagree.
    Stay away from cheap windows!

    If you get an insert window there won't be too much disturbance of the lead. The insert just pops into the existing cavity and covers up much of the old paint inside the window. All your interior and exterior trim stays in place. You can also get aluminum or vinyl wrap to cover exterior trim (and pick your colors) on outside--basically you're just encasing hazardous lead paint which sometimes is less problematic than stripping it.

    On the other hand, if you get a full frame window replacement, they have to rip out everything down to the studs and all the lead paint gets disturbed.

    My advice is to visit showrooms of window manufacturers so you can see for yourself. You just cant get a good look at them from catalogs or ******.

    Good luck!

  3. #3

    Default Re: repair or replace old windows with lead paint?

    Permanent replacement windows means that you can't fix them. Repair your old ones. When you are done you will still have good windows that can be maintained. Once the vinyl windows start to break its new window time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: repair or replace old windows with lead paint?

    Quote Originally Posted by turnip View Post
    We recently discovered that our home (built 1900) has lead paint on all the windows. Fortunately, we qualify for a state grant of $6500 to address the lead issues in the house. The lead removal contractor said that the cost of removing the lead and repairing the old wooden windows is about the same as buying new vinyl replacement windows, and is encouraging us to do the latter. Knowing nothing about replacement windows, my husband and I are unsure of what to do. Will they look terrible in our old home? How long will they last? In the long run, what will be a better buy for the money?
    We live in PA as well and have the same problem. How do you apply for a grant?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    6

    Smile Re: repair or replace old windows with lead paint?

    We applied through our city's Health Bureau. They tested the whole house for lead (no charge), and they're even paying for us to stay in a suite at the Marriott while the work is being done. That's Bethlehem, I don't know if all towns do the same thing. Hope this helps!
    Also, if you live in a town with a historic district, ask if they have a home restoration program. Even though our home isn't technically in the historic area of town, we also qualified for a 50/50 restoration grant (the grant pays for 50% of the work, we pay the other half at 3% for 10 years - great deal!). We're getting a brand new bathroom, and many other needed household repairs.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: repair or replace old windows with lead paint?

    I have been debating on replacing or repairing the windows in my old home (built 1885) for a while. I would like to save money and keep the originality by fixing up the old ones, but I would also love the more efficient and low maintenance replacements. Then I read the article "How to Repair Sash Windows"
    HTML Code:
    http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/intro/0,,20228807,00.html
    At step 4, epoxy is applied to smooth the window frame and fill gaps/rot. Step 5 then says “wait another day” for the epoxy to cure. I realize that not all windows will need this, but I know some of mine will. Am I supposed to board up the window overnight, or just let the robbers have a free-for-all?

    At step 8 after applying the putty you have to wait a week before priming the putty. Ok I can paint the frame, install the glass, reinstall the sash and paint the putty later, but it just seems like a hassle. And you still have to wait for the paint to dry anyway.

    Now if I remove sashes from a couple of windows and board up the openings for a week while I restore the sashes, it will take me at least 11 weeks to repair all 34 windows in my house if I do 3 at a time working every day of the week. Afterward I will still be left with single pane windows and ugly storm windows that I will always have to maintain with fresh paint, fresh putty, etc. Plus I will still have to climb a ladder to wash the outside of the windows. Or I could install new windows by buying 3 or 4 a month when I have extra money and installing them in a couple hours for each window. I will be less work, but more expensive. But I will save on heating and cooling costs, have a significant outside noise reduction, will never have to repaint or re-glaze them, and can clean them from the inside.

    Turnip, you don’t have to worry too much now either way because you have a grant and the work will be done for you, but if you keep the original windows you will always have to maintain them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •