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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    You are absolutely right, Timothy, that hardwood and water are not good bedfellows.

    However, the smoothness, warmth, repairability and cleanability of hardwood flooring over many years of use still make it my top recommendation for my clients' kitchens.

    You can always buy a moisture sensor and place it under the dishwasher and sink if you are concerned about sneaky leaks.

    No kitchen flooring is perfect. They all have their drawbacks: Vinyl has embossing that catches grime and it's not repairable. Linoleum needs to be waxed and periodically stripped. Laminates are easily damaged and not repairable. Stones are cold, and hard on the back and legs.

    Hardwood can be the best of them all with good care and periodical renewal of the finish in traffic areas...AND maintaining your plumbing

    Peggy Deras, CKD, CID
    Kitchen Artworks

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    Ice make lines broken when moving refrigs also a great way to ruin hardwood in kitchens. Think tile in the kitchen and hardwood adjoining it in other rooms. The best of both products...

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    That still presents the problem of aching back, and legs, and feet, from standing on tile Timothy.
    Peggy Deras, CKD, CID
    Kitchen Artworks

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,387

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    so many trade offs in life....

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    Quote Originally Posted by pammylbear View Post
    We had hardwood in our kitchen in a home we owned 17 years ago. It had a Swedish finish applied in place. The floor was okay, in my mind, until I dropped my KitchenAid mixer on it. It got a big ding. We have tile now, but I think if I was to do it over, I'd go with linoleum or vinyl again.
    I wouldn't count on linoleum or vinyl to survive the impact of a KitchenAid mixer. Even assuming it landed in such a way that it didn't make a cut or dent in the linoleum, it's heavy enough that it could dent the particle board substrate.

    And of course, ceramic or porcelain tile would also shatter in such a situation.

    Best advice: Get whatever floor you love most that works best with your lifestyle and your budget, and then do not drop your KitchenAid mixer on it!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    My vote is for wood. You can always refinish it, and it is one of the rare materials that looks better with age, even as it gets dings and cracks. But that's just my personal preference. Good luck with your remodel!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    What I used was marble, It is easy to clean but it is a little expensive.
    I consider myself a very down to earth person but at the same time I try to live my dreams every moment I can. Without dreams, we are nothing.
    Hidden Content

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    white oak is a winner in my opinion

    carpet cleaning

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    hardwood is good in kitchen. especially with how the open concept in homes is so popular. I am having wood installed in my kitchen and look forward to it! Hardwood is timeless! Good luck!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Boston area
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Hardwood in Kitchen?

    I grew up with wide pine floors in the kitchen. They gain character over the years and need refinishing every decade or so, but we didn't have any water problems with 2 boys and 2 cats.

    As for dropping a 50 lbs block of steel in the form of a kitchenaid mixer on your floor and not getting a dent, let me know when they invent a material that can withstand that. Solid diamond flooring, perhaps. No wood or tile will survive that test, and I bet even vinyl will get cut by that. Instead consider a spring-loaded lift for your mixer when storing it under your counter top, securely bolted to prevent such accidents.

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