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  1. #1
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    Aug 2007
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    Cool Replacing B&G dinosaur Boiler Pumps

    I will soon be undertaking the project of replacing my 3 B&G dinosaur boiler pumps with TACO 007's. In theory the project should go like this:
    1) close shut off valves to 3 zones
    2) drain water out of boiler to reduce pressure
    3) turn off system & pumps at breaker and check that correct switches were turned off (OK probably should be #1)
    4) unscrew bolts holding old pumps in line (sounds easy, don't it?) go purchase sawsall
    5) remove old pumps and clean area for new gaskets
    6) install new Taco 007's
    7) reconnect wiring (help here appreciated)
    8) open shut off valves
    9) hope I have an auto-fill system
    10) check psi should be around 12 cold, yes?
    11) go upstairs and bleed radiators
    12) wait 3 months for it to be cold enough to turn on boiler to see if it actually worked
    13) call professional for emergency service call.
    Has anyone undertaken this project? Any and all input would be appreciated. Thanks!
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    Last edited by Landaverde; 08-08-2007 at 05:28 PM. Reason: added pic

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    443

    Default Re[

    Landaverde:

    There is usually no need to replace the Bell & Gossett pumps, unless they start to leak or the bearings get noisy; even then you would have to consider that each type of pump used on boilers has its own "head" characteristics, & the amount of water it pumps per minute.

    Even though they are large, the B&G pumps are from an excellent mfgr. & are very reliable.

    The Taco 007 is a good pump, but it has a "head" of 12' & is thus designed for a boiler system that needs only pump hot water to that height; the B&G's you have might have a "head" of 25' or more, & thus the Taco would not be suitable as a replacement.

    There are also different "flange" fitting sizes on the B&G & the Taco (the flat oval pieces that bolt the pipe ends to the pump).

    Unless you are having trouble with the pumps, I would not recommend changing them; this seems to be an older boiler from the photo; could you post back & advise of the age of the boiler; if it is more than 15 years old, it is often more economical to replace the unit for ~$2k; engineering improvements in boiler design in the past 10-15 years will cut your fuel usage dramatically.

    If you post back with the model # of the B&G, I can look up the "head" ratings of the pumps.

    You can also call the "technical line" 800 number of both B&G and Taco obtained at the websites below, or you can Google "taco pumps" and "Bell & Gossett pumps" to get their websites.

    The technical staff can further advise you of whether you should replace the pumps & the details of approximate costs, pump "head" specifications, flange sizes, and tips on installation, etc.

    http://www.bellgossett.com
    http://www.taco-hvac.com
    http://www.bellgossett.com/BG-selectpumps.asp
    Last edited by JacktheShack; 08-20-2007 at 09:02 AM. Reason: addendums

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    4

    Default Re: Replacing B&G dinosaur Boiler Pumps

    The B&G pumps are still working OK. It's the seals that are failing. I figured since I'd have to open the system to replace the seal (2nd time in 2 years, should have done them ALL the first time, grrrr.) I might as well install a more economical, quiter, smaller pump. The boiler is newer than the pumps, you can't see the boiler in the pic. Every other source of info says Taco 007 is the swap out for the B&G, although I'm sure there are others out there, I've already purchased the Tacos anyway. They look like they'll fit perfectly, I have a little bit of play with the pipes so no flanges needed. This is the first I've heard of the 12' vs 25' 'head'. Are you saying that the pump is incapable of circulating water over 12' of it's installation point? That sucks if that's true. But again, that's the first I've heard that one too.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    4

    Default Re: Replacing B&G dinosaur Boiler Pumps

    Per Taco website:
    When selecting a pump, do I include the head required to get the water to the top of the system?
    Not if it is a closed loop system and the fill pressure is set to equal the elevation + some extra. If the system is charged properly, the pump will need to overcome only the system resistance.

    Whew!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    443

    Default Re: Replacing B&G dinosaur Boiler Pumps

    As I noted in my previous post, I don't think you should attempt this until you've talked to one of the technicans at Taco or B&G; they have pump application charts that match the "head" specs with the GPM (gallons per minute) pump specs; have the B&G model # ready when you talk to the technician.

    B&G's number is 847-966-3700; Taco lists only a non-800 number: (401) 942-8000, but you can e-mail them at their website under "Technical Support": Joe Mattiello, Tom McCormick or Mario Silva if you don't want to pay for a long distance call (they're located in Rhode Island).

    Also consider installing isolating ball valves in the lines to facilitate pump service in the future without having to drain the whole system.

    I would recommend perhaps you replace one pump at a time to make sure you have the technique down & it works properly & then do the other 2 if everything goes ok; make sure you TURN OFF THE SUPPLY VALVE on the pipe that supplies the boiler with fresh water & drain the system before you cut open any lines.

    There's no need to wait for cold weather to test the system, turn the t-stat way up until the boiler comes on to test the system when you've completed work on one of the pumps to make sure everything is working ok.
    Last edited by JacktheShack; 08-20-2007 at 04:08 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    4

    Talking Re: Replacing B&G dinosaur Boiler Pumps

    Well, WE DID IT! Got the pumps swapped out today and we're all up and running for this winter.
    We were able to undo the bolts using some liquid wrench so we did not need to cut them which was nice.
    Here's a valuable tip for you all: There's an arrow on the TACO pumps indicating the direction of flow. And sure enough, there was an arrow on the old B&G also. Be sure your arrows are pointing in the same direction. Don't ask me for any more details on this, as to why I mention this, I WON'T TELL!! Ok, yeah, we put the ****ers in backwards the first time.
    We didn't have to use any flanges, the pump fittings were the same distance and size so I think we lucked out there.
    When getting ready to pull out the old pump you'll want to have someone around to hold the pipe coming down so it doesn't bent too much, we found that propping a fire extinguisher under the pipe was just the right height to keep it from bending while cleaning off the flanges.
    Took us a while to find the automatic fill valve thingy. It kinda looks like the top of a mushroom, ours was shiny brass and it had a little flip leaver on it. I didn't realize this was a manual operation to flip the valve to get it to re-fill. You'll need this to re-fill the system once you have everything put back together.
    Electrical hook-up was very simple: white to white, color to color. However, the wires for us were a little short coming from the wall box. The size differance between the B&G and the TACO made the wires have to travel further. We'll have to get some conduit pipe to go around the new connections.
    I re-filled to 17 psi then bled the registers while circulating and used the drain on the boiler to get system back down to 12 when off. Plan to fire it all back up again in a couple weeks and re-bleed lines just to make sure all is well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    443

    Default Re: Replacing B&G dinosaur Boiler Pumps

    Good Job & Congrats.

    I was worried that you would have lots more trouble than you seem to have had.

    The Tacos should use less juice & are internally lubricated, so they don't require oil.

    Tacos have a reputation for years of reliability.

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