+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    6

    Default Switching outlets to GFI's

    I recently had a home inspection and have to change out my kitchen, bathroom & laundry room outlets to GFI's to meet building codes. The house is from the 40's (best guess), can I simply change out the outlets or will I have to upgrade the wiring as well?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Pasadena, Calif.
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Switching outlets to GFI's

    The code says you need two 20-amperes small appliances circuits in the kitchen. Those receptacles above the countertop and at least 24 inches away from the sink rim have to be GFCI.
    The conductors are usually 12 AWG. The laundry has to have an individual 20 ampere circuit, but some inspectors want GFCI; some inspectors do not. The bathroom has to have GFCI close to the sink.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    666

    Default Re: Switching outlets to GFI's

    Quote Originally Posted by laurieonmll View Post
    I recently had a home inspection and have to change out my kitchen, bathroom & laundry room outlets to GFI's to meet building codes. The house is from the 40's (best guess), can I simply change out the outlets or will I have to upgrade the wiring as well?

    Thanks
    If they are not requiring you to completly upgrade the wiring to meet todays National Electrical Code and simply want to see GFCI protection in the locations you mentioned then no, no need to upgrade. The existing receptacles can be swapped for GFCI's.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Switching outlets to GFI's

    Thank you for the information! They don't require me to upgrade the wiring, just the receptacles.

    Laurie

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    666

    Default Re: Switching outlets to GFI's

    If your house has old two prong receptacles with no grounding conductor then the NEC will allow you to replace them with a three prong GFCI receptacle with no wire attached to the ground prong on the receptacle.

    Receptacles replaced this way should be marked with "No Equipment Ground".

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lakeland ,MN
    Posts
    356

    Default Re: Switching outlets to GFI's

    Take note if you doing this yourself. On each GFI outlet there is a line and load that is marked on the back of the outlet. If you replace all the outlets to GFI you need to connect the wires to the line side of the outlets.White on the siver screw and black on the brass screws. If you have a ground wire that goes on the green screw.
    There is a more reasonable way that you only may need a few replaced to GFI. I think it would be less exspensive if you have a electrician replace them. It would take forever to explain how to do this without having electrical knowlege

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
    Posts
    645

    Default Re: Switching outlets to GFI's

    Central Pa inspectors require all outlets on a kitchen counter to be GFCI protected.
    Laundry room general purpose outlets must be GFCI protected as well. If the outlet is for the washer, then it can be a single outlet, without the hassle of nuisance tripping from the washer.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •