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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    36

    Default Want new kitchen floor. Should old be removed?

    Hi Everyone!

    I am thinking of getting replacement vinyl flooring for the kitchen/dining room, but have a few questions based on the two estimates I received.

    1. Is vinyl sheeting sturdy enough for the area I'd like to replace? Or is something else recommended. I've been told that linoleum sheeting is also good, but I don't see it anywhere. (I'm on a budget, but I would like something that will last.)

    2. Does vinyl flooring fade?

    3. Should I have the new floor installed over the old, builder floor, or have that floor removed.

    One guy wants to install the vinyl sheeting over the builder floor, after the yucky carpeting is removed. The house was built in 1957. At that time the builder installed flooring over the slab. (I'm not sure what it is. One person said it was probably Solarian, while my neighbor, whose house was also built in 1957 says Solarian wasn't made then.)

    The other flooring guy wants to rip up the original floor because he said that's the way to do it right. Otherwise, you run into settling and buckling issues. However, my neighbor,who had a new kitchen floor installed said that the guys didn't want to chance removing the old floor because it was so attached to the slab that they may not get all of it off, and would have to chisel and sand it down in spots. (The result of which sounds terrible looking to me if all of it can't be removed.)The original builder told her in so many words that that floor was meant to last.

    4. I have a pricing question. Is $916 too much for the guys to remove the old carpeting and appliances, prepare the floor for the vinyl sheeting and install the new sheeting? My kitchen/dining room is 17.5x10.5. By the way, the guy who wanted to tear up the old floor wanted $1400.

    My sister's "know-it-all" boyfriend put his two cents worth in and said that the $916 was too expensive for the remnant/in stock piece of vinyl, but he hasn't had to replace a kitchen floor in over 20 years.

    Any suggestions will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Want new kitchen floor. Should old be removed?

    If you are trying to save money why would you not rip up the old flooring yourself and put down a new floor, then it will be much cheaper cause the guy will just have to glue down the new sheeting.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    36

    Default Re: Want new kitchen floor. Should old be removed?

    I may tear up the old carpeting myself, but would not attempt to tear up the old floor/builder floor under the carpet myself because as I said in my original post, there may be a problem.

    Since the original flooring is made to last, something unheard of today, it may not be able to be removed easily if at all. (Also, in my original post, I mentioned that my neighbor had run into the same problem, and her installers wouldn't touch that original floor because removing it may require sanding and other methods of removal -- and might be able to be removed at all.

    My concern, therefore, is if the new flooring would be able to adhere to the original, once the carpet is removed, or would bucking or settling occur?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    nova scotia, canada
    Posts
    1,522

    Default Re: Want new kitchen floor. Should old be removed?

    if there is quite a bit of old residue left from the old flooring which might be more work than its worth to take up your best bet is to install a layer of 1/4 underlay, it will provide a more even surface and make for a fresh gluing surface so to ensure the new floor doesnt come up
    fire up the saw and make some dust

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    the real Northern California
    Posts
    48

    Default Re: Want new kitchen floor. Should old be removed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Toody View Post
    1. Is vinyl sheeting sturdy enough for the area I'd like to replace? Or is something else recommended. I've been told that linoleum sheeting is also good, but I don't see it anywhere. (I'm on a budget, but I would like something that will last.)
    Sheet vinyl comes in many different qualities. Most are "sturdy" enough for the average home. Linoleum is a very tough flooring option too.

    2. Does vinyl flooring fade?
    Not any more.

    3. Should I have the new floor installed over the old, builder floor, or have that floor removed.

    One guy wants to install the vinyl sheeting over the builder floor, after the yucky carpeting is removed. The house was built in 1957. At that time the builder installed flooring over the slab. (I'm not sure what it is. One person said it was probably Solarian, while my neighbor, whose house was also built in 1957 says Solarian wasn't made then.)

    The other flooring guy wants to rip up the original floor because he said that's the way to do it right. Otherwise, you run into settling and buckling issues. However, my neighbor,who had a new kitchen floor installed said that the guys didn't want to chance removing the old floor because it was so attached to the slab that they may not get all of it off, and would have to chisel and sand it down in spots. (The result of which sounds terrible looking to me if all of it can't be removed.)The original builder told her in so many words that that floor was meant to last.
    It's usually better to remove old flooring, but there are disadvantages too. One might be that your old vinyl flooring and/or the adhesive might have asbestos. You could have it abated by professionals, or you could have it encapsulated. Since neither pro you had look at the floor mentioned the possibility of a 54 year old floor having asbestos, you might be better finding one with better qualifications.

    Since you said the floor is of slab construction, jkirk's recommendation of quarter-inch underlayment is inappropriate. Self-leveling cement (SLC) might be an option that will encapsulate the asbestos (if there is any) and provide a smooth, solid surface to install new flooring to.

    4. I have a pricing question. Is $916 too much for the guys to remove the old carpeting and appliances, prepare the floor for the vinyl sheeting and install the new sheeting? My kitchen/dining room is 17.5x10.5. By the way, the guy who wanted to tear up the old floor wanted $1400.

    My sister's "know-it-all" boyfriend put his two cents worth in and said that the $916 was too expensive for the remnant/in stock piece of vinyl, but he hasn't had to replace a kitchen floor in over 20 years.
    No one here, pro or amatuer, could possibly tell you the answer to that. There simply is not enough information to go on.

    I suggest you get your information from qualified flooring professionals who have many years of experience with products and procedures you are talking about. It doesn't get much better than at www.TheFloorPro.com

    Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    36

    Default Re: Want new kitchen floor. Should old be removed?

    Hello Jim,

    Thanks for the response and for the link. I hadn't even thought of asbestos. I'll keep looking!

    Have a nice week!

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