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  1. #1
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    Mar 2008
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    Default Leveling kitchen flloor

    We are in the planning stages of a kitchen remodel and plan to do most, if not all, of the work ourselves. We have a "dip" in the floor in front of one section of cabinets. When I put a straight edge on the floor joists in the basement there are some height differences, but nothing drastic. When we replace the floor, how can we fix the dip? If we replace the subfloor won't it just follow the same dip? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Nov 2007
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    Sand Springs, OK
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    467

    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    To fix the dip you're going to have to fix the floor joists. Either by replacing the ones that are allowing the dip or jacking them back into place and nailing a straighter joist to it. Laminated veneer lumber is something I think I remember being used to be nailed to the old joist.
    Debby in Oklahoma

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    To Debby in Oklahoma:

    How did a stay at home Mom become so knowledgable? Can't just be from watching the show!!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric1435 View Post
    To Debby in Oklahoma:

    How did a stay at home Mom become so knowledgable? Can't just be from watching the show!!
    I helped my grandfather when he had to solve a lot of these problems, my high school boyfriend was in Carpentry and I watch a lot of these shows and read a lot of books. Especially the ones on things like this.
    Debby in Oklahoma

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    14

    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    I don't want to hijack the thread but I have a floor leveling question: I'm doing a bedroom over on the second floor. The previous owner of the house knocked out a carrying wall downstairs many years ago and though the wall is now properly supported downstairs, and pretty level, the upstairs is way off. My bedroom sloped from the outside wall to this inside wall over 3". The other bedroom slopes the opposite way towards this wall the same amount. The hallway is not level. Anyways, I took the floor down to the joists and shimmed the joists about 2 inches to a point where I thought it was pretty level. Then a new subfloor, and new floorboards on top. But the room is still off by 1 1/2". My question/point is -does it NOT make sense to make a floor perfectly level sometimes? If I had made it level, I'd be stepping up from the hallway. Any thoughts or suggestions?
    Thanks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    7

    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    Quote Originally Posted by unregisteredto View Post
    Or depending you could use self levling cement on top of the subfloor.

    This is all interesting as we are beginning a project to install a floating floor and have just realized we have a small "dip" along one of the walls. The question is....What is this leveling cement and how long does it have to dry before laying the flooring?

    Thanks!
    Kathy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    4,045

    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    kathy59 .... as it's name implies it's a cement based product that is mixed fairly runny..... as it's poured it seeks the low spots and will level it out.
    It can be purchased at any home center or perhaps the place you are purchasing the flooring.

    Generally 24 hours to set .


    Hope this helps.

  8. #8
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    Thumbs up Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    Quote Originally Posted by Battis View Post
    I don't want to hijack the thread but I have a floor leveling question: I'm doing a bedroom over on the second floor. The previous owner of the house knocked out a carrying wall downstairs many years ago and though the wall is now properly supported downstairs, and pretty level, the upstairs is way off. My bedroom sloped from the outside wall to this inside wall over 3". The other bedroom slopes the opposite way towards this wall the same amount. The hallway is not level. Anyways, I took the floor down to the joists and shimmed the joists about 2 inches to a point where I thought it was pretty level. Then a new subfloor, and new floorboards on top. But the room is still off by 1 1/2". My question/point is -does it NOT make sense to make a floor perfectly level sometimes? If I had made it level, I'd be stepping up from the hallway. Any thoughts or suggestions?
    Thanks.
    Hopefully this isn't too late.

    Boy .... I shudder every time I hear or see this kind of situation where misguided remodeling takes place. These types of issues when structure is severely compromised is dangerous and obviously wasn't done with a permit .... since I doubt any building inspector would have allowed something like this to be compromised. Then unfortunate and unsuspecting homeowners buy the home not knowing they may be in a serious situation and are stuck with correcting them.

    End of rant and onto your situation .....

    Removing the lower center support would do what you described ..... drop toward the center ..... creating a valley .... 3 inches is sever when it comes to structure.

    It's good that you have installed proper support for the upper floor ..... however .... the approach I would have taken ....... jacking the upper floor to the original level ( within reason ) before permanently installing the lower support.
    This will create a lot of repairing to cracks in walls and door frames being skewed .... but I suspect this was the case over the course of the setting anyway.
    This approach would have brought things up to a point that things may not be perfectly level ( depends .... sometimes you can get things pretty darn close .... not perfect ) but then you would be able to finish things making them " true " to accommodate the slight unevenness.

    Just a thought.

  9. #9
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    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Leveling kitchen flloor

    Quote Originally Posted by canuk View Post
    Boy .... I shudder every time I hear or see this kind of situation where misguided remodeling takes place. These types of issues when structure is severely compromised is dangerous and obviously wasn't done with a permit .... since I doubt any building inspector would have allowed something like this to be compromised.
    Ditto that, Canuk.

    We've run into way too many of these "misguided remodelings" over the years.

    A notable one that comes to mind was a beautiful large brick home built in the '40s where the owners had called us to come fix a plumbing leak. We shoved the job in at the end of the day (around 7:30-ish, IIRC).

    The plumbing leak that had them all upset was caused by a large hole rotted in the trap of a bathroom sink on the second floor. They'd shoved a bucket under it cause they didn't know how to fix it and couldn't figure it out. I had a new trap behind the seat in the truck and so the repair took all of 15 minutes. They were soooooo pleased. Thought we were some kinda genius-caliber miracle workers. Ha! Give me a break.

    After the sink was fixed, the guy asked us if we could take a look at a "little" project he had goin' on in the basement. Wanted a consultation to reassure himself that he was doin' okay....basically. "Okay....let's go have a look."

    As we pass thru the first floor........our eyes about popped outta their sockets. This fella and his wife had placed a 6 person hot-tub on the floor of the once-was dining room! It was a sauna in there. 80% of the plaster on the walls and ceiling had already fallen off from saturation. You can imagine what the windows looked like. He evidently misinterpreted our slack-jawed facial expressions and proudly said......."Pretty cool, huh?" Stepped over and turned on the jets to show us how "cool" it was. We "asked" him about all the missing plaster. He said that they'd decided that was because it was a bad plaster job. No biggie.....they'd get it replastered....eventually. We attempted to correct him about the cause and the exorbitant weight loads on the joists, but........... he wasn't in a "listening" frame of mind. So......we all headed for the basement.

    There.......our brains were soon reeling with yet another "sight". These folks had decided that they wanted to finish out the basement so they could entertain down there. Since there were some "interfering" solid brick walls which divided the basement up into smaller rooms than they desired......they would simply remove those pesky brick walls. Piles of brick lay all over the floor and there in the corner sat the handy sledgehammer.

    Needless to say........these were loading bearing brick walls. "Load bearing?...... what's that mean?"......says he. We quickly assessed what had been done so far and if it was even safe to be down there. The 1st floor load bearing wall above this brick wall had already begun to sag. And.....it became quickly apparent that the guy had stopped the night before...... just short of an immediate and major disaster. If he had removed even two more bricks on either end of this wall.........there would have been catastrophic and instant failure as the ends of this wall were also supporting the ends of huge perpendicular beams. We informed him that he WAS NOT doing okay and pointed out what he had done....and what he had about done. You could finally see a light bulb come on. Now.....finally in an appropriate panic, he asks if we can come fix it all next week. Next week? Har-de har. We were booked out for well over 6 months. We referred him to a couple other local contractors and took our leave.

    Needless to say......what was so astonishing about this all is that here were two people who could not figure out how to replace a trap on a bathroom sink...........but who felt themselves qualified to make decisions about which walls might be important and which ones not............and whether it was okay to plunk a hot-tub down in the dining room. Afterall, they'd seen this sorta remodel thing done on TV all the time. Aye-carumba.
    Last edited by goldhiller; 03-23-2008 at 10:50 AM.

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