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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    2

    Default Problems with paint peeling from ceiling

    I am the process of renovating a room in my house. The paint in one of my rooms is peeling from the ceiling. It looks like it is peeling down to the original sheet rock. When I moved into this house, I painting the ceiling along with the rest of the room. There is no sign of dampness or water staining on the ceiling. I having somewhat the same problem with the ceiling in an upstairs bathroom that had been painted around the same time.
    My concern is that the paint will not peel off throughly from the ceiling; only in large patches. If I repaint over areas that do not peel off, I wonder if the paint that is still there, might continue to give me problems in the near future and will bubble and peel once again. Other that hanging a new layer of sheetrock over the original, are there any recommendations or suggestions for what I should try before going through that process?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    1,131

    Default Re: Problems with paint peeling from ceiling

    How old is the ceiling material? (the house?)

    Is it drywall or plaster? (just checking )

    Which room is this?

    What is directly above this ceiling? .......another room (that bathroom you mentioned maybe), the attic...or)

    Your locale is?

    Did you use oil-base or latex paint?

    Which brand?

    Was there paint on the ceiling when you painted?

    Did you prime first?

    Did you clean the surface first? (If so, with what?)
    Last edited by goldhiller; 03-12-2008 at 09:38 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    2

    Default Re: Problems with paint peeling from ceiling

    Is it drywall or plaster? (just checking )
    - Drywall

    Which room is this?
    - Family room / den

    What is directly above this ceiling?
    - Ceiling rafters, bat insulation, vented space, and roof above rafters

    Your locale is?
    - New Jersey shore area (not located close to water)

    Did you use oil-base or latex paint?
    - Latex (last 2 coats); unknown paint type below those 2 coats

    Which brand?
    - Pratt & Lambert

    Was there paint on the ceiling when you painted?
    - Yes.

    Did you prime first?
    - No, applied 2 coats of the flat paint.

    Did you clean the surface first? (If so, with what?)
    - No.

    **Entire ceiling area shows signs of peeling and crazing. The exposed drywall where paint peeled shows no sign of degradation or moisture.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Problems with paint peeling from ceiling

    Well....the info you've supplied and the fact that the old paint stripped cleanly right back to the drywall itself without apparently causing any visible damage to the drywall paper(tearing or similar)..........or showing any staining from dampness/moisture sources.....leads me to think "off the cuff" that.....

    This is likely a case that the original paint job was applied without first applying any primer. That paint could/would then be barely holding on to the surface. (And the cheaper that paint, the less the adhesion, most likely) When you applied your paint, it created enough surface tension as it dried out to yank the old layer free from the drywall.

    Of course, there's also the possibility that these particular areas of the drywall were contaminated with some substance that would/did interfere with good adhesion....even if a quality primer was used first.

    How to handle it now ? Good question. Kinda depends. You *might* find that the paint outside these areas is well bound to the surface. If it is, then you can likely apply a thin layer of drywall topping compound (the premixed stuff in a bucket) carefully and thinly ...around the perimeter and carefully sand/screen that a bit when it's dry to feather the edges and get a nice visual appearance. Then prime those areas. Then repaint.

    Assuming (or discovering) there's some manner of localized bonding problem ...a bonding product like ThoroBond or similar might be in order before applying the joint compound, primer and paint.

    Another possible approach to visual remedy without resorting to a whole new layer of drywall might be to texture the ceiling as that can hide alot of shortcomings. Not suggesting popcorn, knock-down or similar "heavy" type coatings. Rather something as simple as some semi-soupy drywall topping compound applied with a deep-nap roller and rolled out to a thinnish coat .....should do the deed. Once dry it will shrink back to a very light "pleasing" texture that can hide minor imperfections/irregularities.

    I don't know if there is a perfect answer/remedy to offer in this instance. Much of what might or might not work.....depends. And that info can only be obtained on site.

    Sorry this has happened. It's yet another example of why things need to be done right the first time...or there will be a price to pay...just a tad further down the trail.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    64

    Default Re: Problems with paint peeling from ceiling

    I agree!
    Always clean - and if in doubt, always prime!
    I know your den has got to be much larger than my bath, but when the previous owner died, someone threw some paint on the walls and ceiling of the bath. A few months later, it was molding and peeling. Scraping and sanding just didn't cut it. I had to use a razor blade and peeled whole sheets of paint off the ceiling. A little Kilz Premium, and I was repainting. Now, 2 years later, it still looks great.
    Apparently, the previous owner was just as bad, I had to do the same thing to the garage doors. Beige over turquoise, no primer. Yuck!(who knows, maybe he was responsible for both)
    It looks much better now, but it was a lot of work.
    Painting takes no time at all, but the prep-work, if done right, can take ages. But it makes all the difference!!!

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