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Thread: heating

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default heating

    I am thinking of adding base board heating and would like to know if there is a less costly material to use then 3/4" copper pipe for feed and return. Is there a pvc alternative.
    I am also researching using radint heating.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    443

    Default Re: heating

    Oxygen barrier PEX plastic tubing is widely used these days in hot water & radiant heating.

    The tubing itself is low-cost, but the brass fittings used to connect to the baseboard elements, etc., are often the catch, because they can be very expensive.

    There are several ways to connect them (shark-bite fittings, etc.,); there are expanding & coupling tools by Rehau and others that can be costly.

    I would recommend you go to 1 or 2 local plumbing supply houses in your area & price to cost of the copper tubing & fittings, as compared with the PEX tubing & fittings for the entire job.

    Have ready for them how many feet of 3/4" copper tubing & the number of copper fittings, as opposed to the # of feet of PEX & PEX/brass fittings & the cost of any tools you will need to make the connections.

    Baseboard installs are way easier to do than radiant; radiant can get very complicated.

    Could you further explain what your plans are, & will it be an expansion from your present heating system.
    Last edited by JacktheShack; 03-02-2008 at 04:54 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: heating

    I agree with Jack the Shack almost completly and I would like to add some ideas. Be careful of the words or terms you use. You will not use PVC for any of your heating piping. Use PEX, PEX-AL-PEX, use copper. PEX-AL-PEX is what I suggest since it is PEX with an aluminium pipe with another layer of PEX. It is flexable, it it durable, it retains the heat better, and it is easy to install.

    Baseboard heating would be easier than riping up your floor to put down radiant. But, it will still require an experienced installer part plumber (for the piping)part HVAC (for the tempeture controls). But, if you are a total remodel, go for it. I agree with calling the local plumbing supply house for what they carry and recommend. Even ask for a referal. Good luck. Process of elimination.

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