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  1. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Shamokin, Pa.
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    645

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by gadient View Post
    Yes, that's what they said. I meant to grap the thing this morning and didn't. I have a nice APC UPS with a digital readout now here at work. It also has a cable line filter. I could bottow that for a test but I guess I need to use a grounded outlet. I'll pull a new cable line and run it to a grounded outlet and then try the UPS. What do ya think?
    PS Still working after removing the "diplexor".
    I am wondering out loud why you would have a "diplexor" to begin with. I will admit I know very little about such a device, as I do not have cable.
    I do have Directv for about eight year now, but I do not have a diplexor, as far as I can tell. And I did the complete system instillation all by myself.

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    The Great White North
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Yep -- I'm with Ernie wondering why the diplexor is being used ?

    Is this supposed to be used for resolving the voltage issue at the cable modem ?
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    13

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by canuk View Post
    Yep -- I'm with Ernie wondering why the diplexor is being used ?

    Is this supposed to be used for resolving the voltage issue at the cable modem ?
    Yes it is! lol It isn't my idea but rather the numbskulls that are trying to solve the problem. I still have 2 installed in the attic at the splitters. I did get one of the guys to say the splitters in the attic shouldn't be grounded to my electrical box ground. Currently, it is just a big cluster-f. It will fail again as it always does. They think it is because the voltage builds up to a thresh hold level and then gets discharged by disconnecting the connections, etc.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
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    645

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    I GOOGLED diplexor and found a few tidbits.
    A diplexor allows either a satdish signal or a cable TV feed to be combined with an off air TV antenna feed on one cable. Then a second diplexor before the cable or sat receiver box will split the signal back into two signals for processing. Methinks this is what we are all posting about. It basically, as I understand it, allows you to pull and use one coaxial cable instead of two.
    I still wonder why voltage would be present here thought. Not that I don't believe it is present. We have all scene things that make you scratch your head.
    Most cable & dish men seem to ground blocks to the ground rod outside the house or use the meter base strap method. As demarc boxes are usually located close to those parts of the abode. But it would lead back to the "electrical ground box" anyway.
    As always good luck with your problem. Keep us posted.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    The Great White North
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    4,045

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by gadient View Post
    Yes it is! lol It isn't my idea but rather the numbskulls that are trying to solve the problem. I still have 2 installed in the attic at the splitters. I did get one of the guys to say the splitters in the attic shouldn't be grounded to my electrical box ground. Currently, it is just a big cluster-f. It will fail again as it always does. They think it is because the voltage builds up to a thresh hold level and then gets discharged by disconnecting the connections, etc.
    No kidding
    I'm trying to figure how installing a diplexor with DC voltage block is being used to correct you issue of 47+ AC volts?

    Try running the modem straight from the incoming feed --- no other taps , splitters , etc. ----- see if any voltage appears on the line. If so , then run the modem from the ups ( unplugged ) --- any voltage at the modem F connector proves it's the cable equipment that's faulty.
    By running off the ups battery ( inverted ) power there is complete isolation from your home's electrical which rules it out.
    "" an ounce of perception -- a pound of obscure "
    - Rush

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Shamokin, Pa.
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    645

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by canuk View Post
    No kidding
    I'm trying to figure how installing a diplexor with DC voltage block is being used to correct you issue of 47+ AC volts?

    Try running the modem straight from the incoming feed --- no other taps , splitters , etc. ----- see if any voltage appears on the line. If so , then run the modem from the ups ( unplugged ) --- any voltage at the modem F connector proves it's the cable equipment that's faulty.
    By running off the ups battery ( inverted ) power there is complete isolation from your home's electrical which rules it out.
    I agree. Methinks the diplexor and voltage present in the cable are two separate issues. But I do not have an answer as to how the fit into the puzzle.

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    I ahve the same problem. only the cable company did not tell me i have voltage i found it by accident. i have a cable running from my tv to a wall jack which in turn runs to the outside of my house where the splitter is for the cable company. i plugged the cable into the back of my tv and my tv shut off and it tripped the breaker. after unplugging the tv cable from the wall jack and resetting the breaker, i unscrewed the wall jack to investigate the inside of the wall. there was nothing out of the ordinary there. i grabbed the outer part of the head of the cable coming out of the wall and the same part of the cable coming from the tv and was shocked hard. i got my volt meter and with one lead to ground i found that the cable jack on my tv is putting out 119 volts. i am baffled. my tv seems to work fine. i have an antenna hooked to it now an the picture is good, my dvd/vcr player works just fine. why woud there be ANY voltage coming from the cable jack at my tv much less 119 volts?

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1

    Thumbs up Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    in regards to a voltage problem with cable systems... i was actualy looking up to see what a limit was to how much voltage a television set could put out "acceptably". i work for comcast cable in the sarasota corprate in florida. we are the lightning capital of the world, and t.v.'s get hit regularly. the common ground in a t.v. is the neutral side of a power outlet, if something in that ground goes bad they have a back-up "chasis" ground. as far as cable goes... as stated in the begining of this post we use a groundblock at our demarkation point, as does phone, and also the power company. cable works on a MHz band of about 5MHz-1000MHz(1GHZ) wich is RF (radio frequency) just like you radio in your car or tuner. this means that cable has no voltage on it at all, so in the case of a bad chasis ground or a bad router ground, when hooked to a coax line, the center conductor and/or the braided sheilding acts as that t.v.'s new ground! when the voltage from that t.v. goes to a splitter b4 it transfers to the ground block, it will in turn affect every outlet on that splitter... so as for the guy with 119 volts... first unplug everything hooked to cable and see if it goes away, if it does hook everything up one unit at a time until it returns. if you unplug everything and it remains, unhook the ground wire outside, if this gets rid of the voltage, you have a bad earth ground and need to call an electrician or the power company (this is very common in florida with our lightning problems) and as for the diplexers mentioned... a diplexer passes a band of 1MHz-2GHz wich means cable, sattelite, and off air all pass through this... its used as a conjoiner and also a splitter, so that instead of running two coax lines to one outlet, it uses the one line. however sattelite boxes return voltage wich causes problems with cable, so in most instances, as far as comcast goes, we will try to run a secondary line and seperate the two services... i hope ive cleared up most of the concerns... if not my email is pedwards8459@comcast.net, i would be happy to answer any other questions i am able to!

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    I CURRENTLY HAVE THIS SAME PROBLEM!!!!!

    Ok, so I read through some of the 300+ posts and got tired because people suggest changing splitters on coax, or it's because your tv is old, or wiggle the cord, blah blah blah.

    So get this - We have one main panel that has two main breakers feeding two different subpanels in our house.

    - one to the old section of the house, lousy with knob-and-tube wiring and some new romex

    - one newish (15yr old) subpanel in the new section of house added on with new romex wiring.

    In the "old" section of the house, ALLLLLLL the "appliances" - I'm talkin' VCR, Tivo, cable box, several tvs, dvd player - are ALLLLL putting out voltage in varring amounts = 78v total.
    Now, if we take said VCR, which is putting out 10 volts and is only 2 years old to the new kitchen with new wiring, it puts nothing out. Same with all the other appliances.
    If we separate them ALL and test each one all by it's itty-bitty self just hooked to the wall socket and test the coax coming out - shabang! there's the voltage again!
    I took said VCR to repair shop, they tested it and said there is NOTHING wrong with it, and they couldn't get it to put out any voltage. Sigh.

    I've had two electricians out to test all this, and they both have had NO idea what it was, how it was happening, why one end of the house and not the other, or where to go from here.

    Oh! And we got the OLD subpanel swapped out with new breakers and all JUST to make sure there wasn't something funky (don't know what it could have been) causing this.
    Still, NOTHING. Same ol' voltage problems.

    So, lets recap:
    It's NOT because the devices are old. They range from 15 years old to 2 years old.
    It's NOT the cable box from the cable company.
    It's NOT data on the line, we have a separate line for internet.
    It's NOT a splitter.
    It's NOT poor crimps, the coax has not been bent, it is not going around a jet engine causing interference, I do not have an electric water heater.
    It's NOT coming from outside - this is localized in the house, and I am beginning to belive our house was built on an indian burrial ground and the ghosts have conjured an elctrical poltergiest to prevent us from watching TV in HD.


    Soooo....

    Does anyone have any OTHER suggestions to what this could be?
    Pleeease, anyone?

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
    Posts
    623

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Since the chassis of virtually every piece of residential electronic equipment is supposed to be at the same voltage as the ground at the meter and all sorts of components in the equipment are tied to the chasis it is virtually impossible to hope anything would work on an un-grounded receptacle. No manufacturer would honor a warranty and not only that it's dangerous.

    Don't expect the braid on a cheap piece of co-ax to cure the electrical problems of an un-grounded/bonded system.

    Some double insulated equipment have isolation transformers and don't have grounded receptacle caps. But even with these if you experience lines on your screen, hum in your audio , erratic operation etc. run a good ground to the metal chassis of these appliances and you will probably clear up the problem.

    If you still have a problem stick a screwdriver in the ground 50 ft away from your ground rod(s) in your backyard. Attach a piece of wire to it and measure to your ground rod. You may measure up to 120V AC if you have "earth return" to the pole. It may even be coming from a fault in your neighbors house. Turn off your main breaker to see if it goes away.

    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, http://thesemi-retiredelectrician.com

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