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  1. #1
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    Default voltage in cable coaxial

    I was told by my cable company that I have "voltage" in my cable lines. One or more of the TVs in my home are not grounded properly and volts are ecaping my TV through the cable. This is causing interference in my TV reception and Internet (and who knows what else).
    I have a home built in the 30s and I do not have a ground wire at this recepical. Will the GFCI help prevent this problem? Can I groung the outlet to a cold water line?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikel View Post
    I was told by my cable company that I have "voltage" in my cable lines. One or more of the TVs in my home are not grounded properly and volts are ecaping my TV through the cable. This is causing interference in my TV reception and Internet (and who knows what else).
    I have a home built in the 30s and I do not have a ground wire at this recepical. Will the GFCI help prevent this problem? Can I groung the outlet to a cold water line?
    I CAN'T BUY THAT...

  3. #3
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Nope .... don't buy that.

    First thing .... if the cord from the TV only has a two prong plug then you wouldn't be using the "ground" anyway .... simply the hot & neutral.

    Second .... it's unlikely the TV is feeding any voltage from it's internal tuner into the cable.

    No ... you shouldn't ground the receptacle to the cold water pipe.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    If you have old outlets that are not keyed, that is both slots are the same size, you might try unplugging your TV, turn the plug over and plug it back in. And no an ungrounded GCFI outlet will not work.
    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  5. #5
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by JLMCDANIEL View Post
    If you have old outlets that are not keyed, that is both slots are the same size, you might try unplugging your TV, turn the plug over and plug it back in. And no an ungrounded GCFI outlet will not work.
    Jack
    For a fact, the only code approved way to replace a two wire ungrounded outlet with a three wire grounded outlet is to use a GFCI receptacle with a jumper between the neutral and the ground terminals on the device. In doing this, you have to affix a sticker which clearly states "This Is Not A Grounded Outlet," or words to that effect. This allows the use of three wire cords, and the GFCI will trip if the neutral is broken, but it does not magically provide a ground. While neutral and ground are essentially the same electrical point, they are two different ---but related--- things.

    This will not, however, fix the voltage on coax shield problem. That's a whole 'nother smoke.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Quote Originally Posted by EE98 View Post
    For a fact, the only code approved way to replace a two wire ungrounded outlet with a three wire grounded outlet is to use a GFCI receptacle with a jumper between the neutral and the ground terminals on the device. In doing this, you have to affix a sticker which clearly states "This Is Not A Grounded Outlet," or words to that effect. This allows the use of three wire cords, and the GFCI will trip if the neutral is broken, but it does not magically provide a ground. While neutral and ground are essentially the same electrical point, they are two different ---but related--- things.

    This will not, however, fix the voltage on coax shield problem. That's a whole 'nother smoke.
    Absolutely not correct. Jumpering the neutral and ground is called a "bootleg ground" and is NOT PERMITTED. Installing a GFI is an acceptable way of protecting an ungrounded circuit, and it and all downstream receptacles must be labeled as being ungrounded.

    If you jumper the ground and the neutral becomes broken upstream of the GFI, the ground will become live. "Grounded" appliances will have their chassis electrified which becomes a shock hazard. The GFI cannot protect against this shock hazard.

    Besides, you resurrected a thread that's over five years old with information that's irrelevant to the original post. That's classic behaviour of a spammer.
    Last edited by Fencepost; 09-09-2013 at 11:52 PM.
    The "Senior Member" designation under my name doesn't mean I know a lot, it just means I talk a lot.I've been a DIYer since I was 12 (thanks, Dad!). I have read several books on various home improvement topics. I do not have any current code books I can refer to. I was an apprentice plumber for two years.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Print my post and your comment, and contact your local electrical inspector.

  8. #8

    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    HTML Code:
    This is causing interference in my TV reception and Internet (and who knows what else).
    Is your internet a dedicated line seperate from your tv?
    I had a problem with interference also -the problem was that I branched of of my tv line to my cable modem.I seperated them and now they work fine.Its worth a try

  9. #9
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    Who knows what the set up is .... considering there are more than one TV's and a modem then it's guaranteed a splitter is being used somewhere.

    These splitters are known to go bad and cause interference for TV signals.

    There could be a signal drop which means an amplifier may be needed.

    It could be simply poor connections done to the cables themselves.

    There are two components here ... TV and Data ... usually for both to be affected usually means a poor connection of the actual cable feed.

    If it's an outside connection on overhead lines there could be a corroded connection outside and the cable guy may not have felt like climbing a ladder to check.... same with under ground run lines.... poor connection at the outside box.

    The cable could be run along fluorescent lights or something with a motor picking up strong EM/RF interference. For example ... I have a surround receiver with a cooling fan .... when the receiver was situated too close to the TV and when turned on .... the cooling fan would cause interference to the TV but wouldn't affect the cable modem.

    I doubt it has anything to do with what was described by the original poster.

    Lots of other possibilities.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: voltage in cable coaxial

    I have had problems like you described before. I suggest start with either replacing the connectors if they are crimped on. Or if they are the twist on type try re terminating them. Just make sure the outer shield connects to the outer shell of the connector. Also make sure the center copper conductor does not come on contact with the outer shield. This is usually what cause the weak signal.The cable companies use a DBM meter that measures signal loss. a good technician can tell what cables are giving you the problems. If the technician is just a installer he usually does not know what he is measuring other then what is the minimum standard is required. Ask the cable company to send a technician that knows what he is doing. The one you had did not have a clue... good luck

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