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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    1

    Question cast iron sewer line repair

    Our sewer line runs under the concrete basement floor from the back of the house to the front of the house where it exits toward the septic tank. The house is 61 years old. A plumber called to evaluate the line due to sewer gas smells and a constant dripping stream of water entering the septic tank said that I needed to rip out a section of the concrete floor in order to install a new sewer line under the concrete (30 feet front to back).
    I have heard that there is a product I could use to line the existing pipe without having to dig up the floor, but I cannot find any information on it. Supposedly it is some type of flexible PVC type tubing used to line old cast iron pipe. The existing pipe is 4".
    Do you know of any such product? Is it worth it? Does it work? How expensive? Is it a DIY project? Or should I go with the plumbers advice and rip up the floor?
    As to the constant flow of water into the septic, I have turned off all the toilets in the house, but there is still water flowing.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Fayette County, Ohio
    Posts
    6,102

    Default Re: cast iron sewer line repair

    You might want to contact these people to see if they have someone in your area.
    http://www.perma-liner.com/perma_lateral.html

    Jack
    Be sure you live your life, because you are a long time dead.-Scottish Proverb

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    69

    Thumbs up Re: cast iron sewer line repair

    Quote Originally Posted by gwamsr View Post
    Our sewer line runs under the concrete basement floor from the back of the house to the front of the house where it exits toward the septic tank. The house is 61 years old. A plumber called to evaluate the line due to sewer gas smells and a constant dripping stream of water entering the septic tank said that I needed to rip out a section of the concrete floor in order to install a new sewer line under the concrete (30 feet front to back).
    I have heard that there is a product I could use to line the existing pipe without having to dig up the floor, but I cannot find any information on it. Supposedly it is some type of flexible PVC type tubing used to line old cast iron pipe. The existing pipe is 4".
    Do you know of any such product? Is it worth it? Does it work? How expensive? Is it a DIY project? Or should I go with the plumbers advice and rip up the floor?
    As to the constant flow of water into the septic, I have turned off all the toilets in the house, but there is still water flowing.
    There was just a recent program on Holmes on Homes, on channel 286 of Direct TV, showing this exact same problem. You must watch Mike Holmes on his program, showing at 9-10 in the mornings, or 5-6 in the evening.

    There is now a new product, that is slid into the old cast iron pipe, a solution is forced inside, then held in place by a flexible, inflatable tube, held in place by air pressure. Once the product has hardened, the inflatable tube is removed, and you have a new sewer line.

    I have not seen this product before, so you might contact Holmes on Homes. This is something a contractor would have to do. Otherwise, just break up the old concrete, taking your time, replace the old line with 4" PVC pipe, back fill with stones around the new line, cover with concrete, and you are done. I know, lots of work, but you will same money, I am sure, and you can do it yourself.

    The constant seeping of water into the septic tank is probably ground water leaking into the broken sewer line, or the weeping tile around the foundation is attached to the sewer line, as well. Mike has run into that problem on several of his programs.

    Good luck. It looks like that new product would be a good way to go, depending on costs.

    Rodney

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