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Thread: My Birch Tree

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    3

    Default My Birch Tree

    I have a Birch tree that I believe died in the drought last year. Someone told me they were useful for things projects or crafts or something. How should I cut it down? What parts are most valuable? What about the bark? The tree was about 15 years old. My sister bought the tree and gave it to my dad to plant. He died in 94. This tree is really important to me.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: My Birch Tree

    A chain saw is the easiest way to cut down a tree, but if you haven't used one before its probaly easier just to use a hand saw. Don't try an Axe though, a saw is far easier and safer. If its only a 15 year old tree I'd assume its not that big, but still be careful if you do cut it down, make sure you know where its going to fall, and that there is nothing in the way. If you're uncomfortable with it, call a tree guy.

    Lots of projects you can do with Birch wood, The most 'valuable' parts are generally the bigger straiter pieces. You can make some nice rustic furniture out of it. Can also use the big pieces for decoration in the summer in a fireplace.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Default Re: My Birch Tree

    Hope this doesn't sound like a stupid question, but you say that you think the tree died in a drought. Are you certain, or is there a possibility that it may have been damaged by the lack of water, lost all its leaves, but still survived? Considering the tree's importance to you, you might want to wait until whenever it normally starts producing leaves before you give up on it. Also, late winter is a good time to apply fertilizer as the roots will absorb it and it will push the new spring growth. (Personally, I like Espoma Tree Tone, an organic fertilizer. Many garden centers carry it....if not, ask them if they can get it for you. The bag will tell you how to apply it.)

    I mention the possibility of the tree still being alive since I have an ancient (60-plus years) apple tree that could have been written off for dead 2 years ago. It lost most of its leaves in early summer courtesy of apple scab, and I was considering having it cut down. Like you, though, I had a real attachment to this tree.....it is the absolute last of the fruit trees from our family's orchard business. Because of that, I got a professional "tree guy" to do a partial pruning early last Feb. (Never do a full pruning on a sick tree. It needs to be done over several years.) In '07, it bounced back beautifully. Didn't get any scab and even produced an apple or two! Will see what this year holds.

    So, hope this information helps. But if you know for certain the tree is dead, you already have some good advice on what to do! Keep us posted!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    3

    Talking Re: My Birch Tree


    Thanks, everyone for the advice. I am definately going to wait. I will be optimistic. I just look out the door at it every day and it is forever loosing branches that are just crumbly. There is a moss or something that has started growing on it. (Kinda milky aqua-greyish; it feels like furry kinda...) I'm sure that discription helped... Ha!

    I live in Tennessee and every tree I have has a tiny bud on it. I don't see anything on this one at all... But, if all else fails, I will find a way to make something of it. My family has been in the house I live in for the last 150 years. There are lots of momentos around the house that were made by my dad, my papa and the whole lot of them. A craftsman is a craftsman is...the granddaughter of a craftsman! I 'crafted' hair for 25 years and now I am a professional paper-hanger. Now, I am trying my hand at gourds and art with them. Really fun!

    (Sorry!, I have ADD and get off track sometimes!)

    Thanks for the advice!

    Darlene

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    3

    Talking Re: My Birch Tree

    By the way, good luck with your trees! ***, that's old for a fruit tree. I have a couple of plum trees my papa planted that are magnificant! But, the worms get the fruit. Somebody said to spray it with something when it blooms. Do you know anything about that?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: My Birch Tree

    Darlene:

    As for spraying your plum trees, I really can't suggest anything offhand. When my family had the orchard business (apples and peaches, mainly, but some plums), unfortunately they used the heavy duty pesticides. That was back in the days when stuff like DDT and malathione were commonly used.....BLAH!!!!

    These days, I try to stick to organic methods. I have two very young plum trees (the blue plum type); one is about 4 years old and I just planted the other last spring, as the first was not being pollinated. At this point, no fruit yet, so I can't recommend anything in particular to use. Why not just go ****** and do a Google search for what to use for worms in fruit trees? Depending on which route you want to take, pesticide or organic, you'll probably get plenty of suggestions in both areas. What sort of plums are they? Seems the blue ones (I can never think of their name) are pretty hardy. I know someone who has several, never sprays, and the fruit is perfect.

    Let me know what you find out, please.

    Judy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    53

    Default Re: My Birch Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by JudyZ View Post
    Hope this doesn't sound like a stupid question, but you say that you think the tree died in a drought. Are you certain, or is there a possibility that it may have been damaged by the lack of water, lost all its leaves, but still survived? Considering the tree's importance to you, you might want to wait until whenever it normally starts producing leaves before you give up on it. Also, late winter is a good time to apply fertilizer as the roots will absorb it and it will push the new spring growth. (Personally, I like Espoma Tree Tone, an organic fertilizer. Many garden centers carry it....if not, ask them if they can get it for you. The bag will tell you how to apply it.)

    I mention the possibility of the tree still being alive since I have an ancient (60-plus years) apple tree that could have been written off for dead 2 years ago. It lost most of its leaves in early summer courtesy of apple scab, and I was considering having it cut down. Like you, though, I had a real attachment to this tree.....it is the absolute last of the fruit trees from our family's orchard business. Because of that, I got a professional "tree guy" to do a partial pruning early last Feb. (Never do a full pruning on a sick tree. It needs to be done over several years.) In '07, it bounced back beautifully. Didn't get any scab and even produced an apple or two! Will see what this year holds.

    So, hope this information helps. But if you know for certain the tree is dead, you already have some good advice on what to do! Keep us posted!

    I agree, probably the tree is not dead. Try re-fertilizing the soil and wait for the next 4 seasons before cutting off the tree. Not unless you are in a hurry to cut it down.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,768

    Default Re: My Birch Tree

    Quote Originally Posted by draaag1 View Post
    By the way, good luck with your trees! ***, that's old for a fruit tree. I have a couple of plum trees my papa planted that are magnificant! But, the worms get the fruit. Somebody said to spray it with something when it blooms. Do you know anything about that?
    Prior to bloom, in late winter, you can spray it with a dormant oil spray. During bloom, you can spray with an organic insecticidal soap or a BT spray. You can follow up after fruit set with a BT spray.

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