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Thread: Electrical

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Default Electrical

    I have some electricians over at my place. On reviewing a job that was done, I noticed that they had run a single green wire from a wall plug outlet and attached by screw to the underside of the of the kitchen sink. I see their reason for doing which is to ground out any surge right?
    What was my next question and indication to them was that the green ground wire seems to be of no use because the plumbing all the way through the house is that of PVC piping. When told this, they said that it was the electrical code, and it was known that washing wares during thunder showers was to avoid.
    What am I to suggest next? The kitchen sink is inside a covered building.

    Waiting on answers

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,906

    Default Re: Electrical

    If you have a garbage disposal or if you were to drop an electrical appliance into the sink that is still plugged it, the sink could electrocute you. The green wire grounds the sink itself. The wall outlet should be on a GFI circuit.

    This has nothing to do with surges.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Columbiana, Alabama
    Posts
    793

    Default Re: Electrical

    Quote Originally Posted by workupafuss View Post
    I have some electricians over at my place. On reviewing a job that was done, I noticed that they had run a single green wire from a wall plug outlet and attached by screw to the underside of the of the kitchen sink. I see their reason for doing which is to ground out any surge right?
    What was my next question and indication to them was that the green ground wire seems to be of no use because the plumbing all the way through the house is that of PVC piping. When told this, they said that it was the electrical code, and it was known that washing wares during thunder showers was to avoid.
    What am I to suggest next? The kitchen sink is inside a covered building.

    Waiting on answers
    The green ground wire from a properly grounded receptacle to the sink was/is a proper method to ensure the sink is at ground potential.

    Even if the sink is fed with PVC there are some instances where it could become energized.

    The Code requires ground screws have a least two full threads engaged in metal or a nut and bolt to properly ground a object. So, self tapping screws etc. are not adequate.

    It appears the electricians did the right thing and BTW all countertop receptacles including any within six feet of a sink must be GFCI protected, as was previously stated.
    Good Luck from Columbiana, Alabama
    Maurice Turgeon, Hidden Content

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    2,478

    Default Re: Electrical

    I'm late here on this thread and lacking a current code book, but am I to understand that we are now required to independently ground metal sinks? I can't recall seeing any that has a provision for that and grounding through the hold-down clips would be an indirect path. I guess I could drill through the flange and use a nut and bolt.

    Just wanting to remain current on the codes!

    Phil

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