+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Default Many Window questions.

    Question 1: Our windows to the north are super cold and we have so much condensation on them that it will actually run onto the floor or actually freeze. They are new Quaker windows and we can't figure out why they are so cold. I was wondering if we could put storm windows on them like I see in the older house? This would create a nice air space that I'm hoping will reduce the amount of condensation. The rep didn't know if we could

    Question 2: We just had our window rep come out and look at these windows. I asked him if they were low e glass and he said no. But he also said that low e glass doesn't provide any benifits on north windows. Is that true?

    Question 3: The rep also said that all glass is equal and it's not the glass that is the problem but the humidity in the house. Which we keep around 35-40% at 68 deg if it gets much lower we get nose bleeds. Every thing I've looked at said that is fine for down to 0 deg outside.

    So it comes down to this. I know condensation on windows is normal but the amount we have actually running off the windows is crazy. AND when it's cold enough it actually freezes. The rep is basicly blaming the humidity and our geo-themal system saying it's not putting out hot enough air to dry the windows. Just to give you an example of the temps I'm dealing with. As of right now it's 67 inside 35 outside and the glass temp is 49.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    I not sure if you've read this but perhaps there may be some helpful information.

    http://advice.thisoldhouse.com/showthread.php?t=4147

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sand Springs, OK
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    I can only offer a couple of opinions

    about Low E glass~~It is true that low e glass isn't necessary for northern windows. This is because no direct sunlight should be coming through a true northern window.

    If you are concerned about the moisture in those rooms then I would suggest you invest in better air circulation in those rooms.

    I don't have the same windows but I have the same problem. My double pane windows that face the north have condensation and freezing on them a lot in the winter. First I chalk it up to the fact that both of these windows are in bathrooms where moisture should be vented. Second, I know the moisture should be vented but isn't because the "boys" refuse to use the vent option on the light fixture.


    For your room perhaps removing curtains to get better airflow, or pointing a fan directly at the windows would be a better option even having a ceiling fan going in that room would "dry" the panes of glass better.

    Be sure to vent rooms that have high humidity properly and humidify your noses with saline spray instead of moisture in your house.
    Debby in Oklahoma

  4. #4

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    I have read many different articles on condensation on window and understand that it's always going to be there but never in my life have I seen it this bad. I installed double pain windows in my previous home to replace aluminum ones and they got damp but never enough to run off onto the floor. Of course blowning a fan on it and removing all forms of shades or curtains would help and even stop it but that doesn't solve the issue. It' just dumb founds me that the temp difference between the window and the outside temp is only 15 Degree's or so. Leaving the blinds up with that cold of area makes the room feel cold and drafty. Thanks for all the suggestions but I'm going to keep looking for a better solution and will post any findings I may have.

    One thing that the window rep is looking into is the storm windows. I know it sounds old fashion but last year our outside doors also had a moister problem. Over the summer we installed storm doors that has the full glass that can switch to full screen. Welp with the glass in this winter and the dead air between the two the doors have yet to sweat this year. I just don't know if we can do it on vinyl windows.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    Sure putting some sort of storm window may resolve the issue ...but you have to ask why on newly installed windows.

    Triple-pane windows allow even higher humidity levels in the house without condensation, because the inner pane of glass is even warmer for the same temperature outdoors.

    One thing to consider ... are the windows or the area immediately around the windows leaky. When you say they are freezing I'm guessing that means frost which to me indicates cold drafty air.


    Condensation on the inner surface of the inside pane of well-installed double-pane windows is generally considered to be the upper-limit indicator of how much humidity your house can tolerate on a given day. The colder it is outside, the colder is the inside pane of glass and the lower you will have to maintain your house's relative humidity. That's why household humidity levels are always based on outside temperatures.

    Frost on the inner pane or the frame also indicates a leak .... allowing cold outside air in ..... the space between the finished window frame and the house rough framing may be insulated but is not sealed air tight ....... allowing cold wind to blow through and chill the inside pane or the frame itself.
    Last edited by canuk; 02-18-2008 at 09:36 AM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    Quote Originally Posted by canuk View Post
    Sure putting some sort of storm window may resolve the issue ...but you have to ask why on newly installed windows.

    Triple-pane windows allow even higher humidity levels in the house without condensation, because the inner pane of glass is even warmer for the same temperature outdoors.

    One thing to consider ... are the windows or the area immediately around the windows leaky. When you say they are freezing I'm guessing that means frost which to me indicates cold drafty air.


    Condensation on the inner surface of the inside pane of well-installed double-pane windows is generally considered to be the upper-limit indicator of how much humidity your house can tolerate on a given day. The colder it is outside, the colder is the inside pane of glass and the lower you will have to maintain your house's relative humidity. That's why household humidity levels are always based on outside temperatures.

    Frost on the inner pane or the frame also indicates a leak .... allowing cold outside air in ..... the space between the finished window frame and the house rough framing may be insulated but is not sealed air tight ....... allowing cold wind to blow through and chill the inside pane or the frame itself.
    Well as far as storm windows they still do it in the further north so why not? Isn't your windows no matter how good they are your weakest point as far as heat lost? Just not sure you can do it on vinyl

    When I say they freeze up I actually mean FREEZE not frost. It starts at the handle that runs all the way across where it meets the glass from there the glass will start freezing and also below the handle. I'm not sure if the ice below the handle is from the run off or what. If a night is 10 or below when we wake up their will be so much ice on them that You can't open the windows. Maybe with an ice pic.

    I've heard somewhere else that windows shouldn't freeze and if they do their must be a draft or air leak so I guess I'll have to pull the frame off one and see what it looks like behind it. I just hope I can do it with out tearing up the wood.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    4,045

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    Well as far as storm windows they still do it in the further north so why not?
    LOL.... Well up here in the Great White North we don't ... no need ..... unless they are the old and rare single pane windows .


    Isn't your windows no matter how good they are your weakest point as far as heat lost?
    Yes ... that's precisely the whole point about the moisture levels in the home creating condensation.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    New good quality, properly installed double-paned windows should not have excessive condensation. My new windows only rarely fog up under extreme conditions (boiling water or long shower taking on the coldest days).

    Low E is beneficial regarless of orientation. It offers the benefit of keeping heat inside in the winter and heat outside in the summer.

    Something is making the inside pane excessively cold. Either air is getting around the window because of poor installation or its getting through the window because of a defect or poor quality.

    I wouldn't consider storms right now. Check the warranty. If your windows don't live up to their claims, you may be entitled to restitution or replacement. Pester your joker window man until you get satisfaction.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Many Window questions.

    I second Bobby. You have a MAJOR air leak somewhere. My guess, very close to the window more than likely the window itself. Low E is VERY important regardless of which way it faces. It reflects the heat radiating from all of the solid surfaces in your home back inside. I live and work in upstate NY and work with windows a lot and also troubleshoot leaks and the like. If it is 30 degrees outside and 70 degrees inside your glas should be between 60 and 62 degrees.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •