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Thread: Cold Windows

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1

    Default Cold Windows

    During a snow and wind storm we had in Northeast Ohio, I felt cold air comming in between the upper and lower window halfs. Should there be something like weatherstripping to stop wind from coming in? These windows are of vinyl construction and double hung.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Richmond, VT
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Cold Windows

    Try "seal-n-peel" a temoporary caulk that you can peel away in the spring. My POS replacement windows leak/draft no more, which is nice for the VT winters. Word of warning, it is a toulene based product, so will stink for a day or two.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    0

    Cool Re: Cold Windows

    Try this. Go to the hardware store and look at the threshold door sweeps. These are strips of rubber that tack on to the bottom of a door to prevent drafts of air entering under the door. There should be a size that would fit. If no, look at the vinyl trimming used in finish carpentery to overlap the gap.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Re: Cold Windows

    There *should* be a piece of weatherstripping between those mating rails.

    Sometimes furry pile type stuff, sometimes a hollow vinyl bulb. If none of your windows has any there....it might indicate that they never did. If they did at one time but it is all worn out now and missing fromthem all.....you may see/find a small thin kerf in one of the rails where it was previously installed.

    If that kerf is there, you can buy numerous types of replacement weatherstripping from various sources. Post back and we can point you to some sources.

    I'm a fan of the Seal & Peel/ Zip Away/ Weather Seal types of temporary caulks. However, I'd be a little cautious I think about using them on vinyl windows. This because the contained solvent (tolulene or lacquer thinner) could melt-dissolve into the vinyl. I'd do a short test strip first (maybe an inch or two) and allow it to dry overnight...then look to see if there's any evidence of vinyl melt before proceeding with all the windows. The reason for this caution...is because I've never used the stuff on vinyl and so can't say definitively whether it would or would not cause a problem in that regard.

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